Chapter6_lecture - Introduction The emphasis thus far has...

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Introduction The emphasis thus far has been on crystalline materials. There are numerous engineering materials that lack the long range translational periodicity of a crystalline material. These non-crystalline materials are referred to as either- amorphous, glassy, or super- cooled liquids. Theoretically, any material can form an amorphous structure if solidified at sufficiently high enough rates. This chapter will emphasize the structural considerations that facilitate the development of an amorphous structure.
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Elements S, Se, P Oxides SiO 2 , B 2 O 3 , P 2 O 5 , GeO 2 , AsO 2 Halides BF 2 , AlF 3 , ZnCl 2 , Ag(Cl,Br,I),Pb(Cl 2 ,Br 2 ,I 2 ) Sulfides As 2 S 3 , Sb 2 S 3 Selenides Various compounds of Tl, Sn, Pb, As, Sb, Bi, Si, and P Tellurides Various compounds of Tl, Sn, Pb, As, Sb, Bi and Ge Nitrides KNO 3 -Ca(NO 3 ) 2 and many mixtures containing alkali and alkaline earth nitrates Sulfates KHSO 4 and many other binary and ternary mixtures Carbonates K 2 CO 3 -MgCO 3 Polymers Polystyrene, PMMA, polycarbonate, PET Metallic Alloys
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2010 for the course MSE 2001 taught by Professor Tannebaum during the Summer '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Chapter6_lecture - Introduction The emphasis thus far has...

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