Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 1 Unitary executive When a president...

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Chapter 7 1. Unitary executive – When a president claims prerogative to attach signing statements to bills and asserts his right to modify implementation or ignore altogether provisions of a new law that encroaches on his constitutional prerogatives as commander in chief. a. The unitary executive holds that presidents may remove all subordinates in the executive branch; they may also direct these subordinates to take a particular action; and they can veto any objectionable actions, including those mandated by Congress. 2. Signing statements – a statement issued by the president that is intended to modify implementation or ignore altogether provisions of a new law 3. Where presidents can change a policy unilaterally, they gain the opportunity to exercise agenda control over Congress’s choices. The Framers sought to have Congress set the president’s agenda by having it present bills to the president for his vote. However, the institution’s design gives the president the capacity to take the initiative. 4. Imperial presidency – an elected monarch with a entourage of aides to do his bidding 5. Commander in chief – denotes the president’s authority as head of the national military 6. War Powers Act – requires that the president inform Congress within 48
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Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 1 Unitary executive When a president...

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