Lab 2 - Why don’t small snakes bask Juvenile broad-headed snakes trade thermal benefits for safety Jonathan K Webb and Martin J Whiting Webb J K

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Unformatted text preview: Why don’t small snakes bask? Juvenile broad-headed snakes trade thermal benefits for safety Jonathan K. Webb and Martin J. Whiting Webb, J. K. and Whiting, M. J. 2005. Why don’t small snakes bask? Juvenile broad- headed snakes trade thermal benefits for safety. / Oikos 110: 515 / 522. Previous studies have suggested that most small Australian elapid snakes are nocturnal and rarely bask in the open because of the risk of predation by diurnal predatory birds. Because the physiology and behaviour of reptiles is temperature dependent, staying in refuges by day can entail high thermoregulatory costs, particularly for juveniles that must grow rapidly to maximise their chances of survival. We investigated whether the risk of predation deters juveniles of the endangered broad-headed snake ( Hoplocephalus bungaroides ) from basking, and if so, whether there are thermal costs associated with refuge use. To estimate avian attack rates on snakes, we placed 900 plasticine snake replicas in sunny locations and underneath small stones on three sandstone plateaus for 72 h. At the same time we quantified the thermal benefits of basking vs refuge use. On sunny days, juveniles could maintain preferred body temperatures for 4.7 h by basking but only for 2.0 h if they remained inside refuges. Our predation experiment showed that basking has high costs for juvenile snakes. Predators attacked a significantly higher proportion of exposed models (13.3%) than models under rocks (1.6%). Birds were the major predators of exposed models (75% of attacks), and avian predation did not vary across the landscape. By trading heat for safety, juvenile H. bungaroides decreased the potential time period that they could maintain preferred body temperatures by 57%. Thermal costs of refuge use may therefore contribute to the slow growth and late maturation of this endangered species. Our results support the hypothesis that nocturnal activity in elapid snakes has evolved to minimise the risk of avian predation. J. K. Webb, School of Biological Sciences, The Uni v . of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia ([email protected]). / M. J. Whiting, School of Animal, Plant and En v ironmental Sciences, Uni v . of the Witwatersrand, Pri v ate Bag 3, Wits 2050, South Africa. Most animals modify their behaviour and reduce their activity levels in the presence of predators (Lima and Dill 1990). One widely used predator avoidance strategy is to avoid activity during time periods when predators are most active. For example, freshwater and oceanic zooplankton often migrate vertically at night to avoid fish predators (Gliwicz 1986, Hays 1995). In several groups of mammals and insects, predation risk from diurnal birds may prevent activity during daylight hours (Speakman 1995, Halle 2000). For example, most species of insectivorous bats hunt during the night, even though prey abundance is much higher during the day (Rydell and Speakman 1995, Rydell et al. 1996)....
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2010 for the course BIOS 101 taught by Professor Molumby during the Fall '08 term at Ill. Chicago.

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Lab 2 - Why don’t small snakes bask Juvenile broad-headed snakes trade thermal benefits for safety Jonathan K Webb and Martin J Whiting Webb J K

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