11_Microsoft_Access - CSI 1306 F Computing Concepts for...

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Unformatted text preview: CSI 1306 F Computing Concepts for Business LECTURE 11: CREATING DATABASES WITH MICROSOFT ACCESS Database Modeling In the last lecture, we defined a database simply as a collection of interrelated data files. We also learned important concepts such as entities, relationships, attributes, primary and foreign keys. Then we used an entity-relationship diagram (ERD) to model the abstract view of the underlying database structure. And we proceeded by mapping any ERD into a set of logical tables under the relational model (RM). Today we will go further and actually create the physical database based on the logical RM modeling. Database Management Systems To create a database in practice, we need any piece of software called Database Management System. A Database Management System ( DBMS ) is a set of computer programs that controls the creation, maintenance and use of the database for any organization and its end users. Organizations often lay down control of database development in the hands of database administrators (DBAs) and other spets. A DBMS allows different user application programs to easily access the same database. In large systems, a DBMS allows users and other software to store and retrieve data in a structured way. Relational Database Management Systems A DBMS may use any of a variety of database models such as the network model or the relational model . We have already introduced the relational model, in which both entities and relationships are represented as a set of interconnected tables. If a DBMS complies with the rules defined by the relational model, we call it a relational DBMS (RDBMS). Most popular commercial and open source databases currently in use are based on the relational model. Examples of RDBMS Microsoft Access In this lecture, we will formally introduce Microsoft Access as the RDBMS to be used in our course. Microsoft Access is proprietary software (i.e. it needs to be purchased) of Microsoft company and it comes as part of the Microsoft Office package. Why Access over any other RDBMS? It is fairly easy to learn for students. Its graphical user interface (GUI) abstracts the user from the complicated database commands being carried out behind the scenes. Very popular for small businesses and academic audiences. Microsoft Access Lecture will be based on Access 2007. However if you have the 2003 version instead, check the following online resources to learn it from scratch: http://www.teacherclick.com/access2003/index.htmhttp://www....
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11_Microsoft_Access - CSI 1306 F Computing Concepts for...

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