{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Introduction to Visual Basic 2008 Express

Introduction to Visual Basic 2008 Express - Introduction to...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction to Visual Basic 2008 Express For Engineers Introduction to Visual Basic 2008 Express Edition The Basic programming language was developed at Dartmouth in the early 1960’s. Visual Basic was created by Microsoft in 1991. Visual Basic 2008 Express Edition is similar to the original Visual Basic but is much more powerful. It can be downloaded free from Microsoft at: http://www.microsoft.com/Express/Download/ To do any of the example labs , you will need to download and install Microsoft’s Visual Basic 2008 Express Edition. The Integrated Development Environment (IDE) should look something like this: Tool Box Solution Explorer Properties Window Blank Form Menu and Tool Bars
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Program Development Cycle Our computer program is called a project , application or solution . Software refers to a collection of instructions to tell the computer what we want done. The computer only knows what the programmer tells it to do. The programmer must know how to solve the problem. The programmer will need to determine the output desired, that is the Graphic User Interface (GUI). Then the programmer needs to determine what input is required to get the desired output. Next the programmer needs to determine the processing needed to take the input and end up with the desired output. Note, we determine the output first, then the input and then the processing. There are several tools used by programmers to design a solution to the problem. Programming Design Tools Flowcharts (graphic) Pseudo code (similar to computer code) Hierarchy Charts (graphical) Algorithms (list of steps) You can look up each for more det ail. We don’t need to use any of these tools for our programs. Program Development Cycle 1. Define the problem 2. Design a solution using a programming tool if desired 3. Create the interface (GUI) 4. Set the properties 5. Write the code 6. Run, test and debug 7. Add any documentation We will concentrate on steps 3, 4 and 5.
Image of page 2
Visual Basic Controls Visual Basic has many controls and they are found in the toolbox which is usually on the left side in the IDE. They can be added to the form by double clicking the control or drag and drop the control from the toolbox to the form. You can also single click the control, point where you want the control and stretch to the size you want. We will look at four controls. Default names are TextBox1, Button1, Label1 and ListBox1.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Controls have events, properties and methods. The Text Box control is usually used for input or output. When it is used for output, the Read Only property is usually set to True. The caption on the Button Control should indicate the effect of clicking the button. Setting the Text property determines the caption on the button. The Label Control is used for information. It is usually used to explain the contents of a text box. Setting the Text property determines the caption in the label. By default, the Auto Size property is set to True. You will need to set the property to False to be able to resize the control manually. The List Box control can be used to display several pieces of information (output). It can be also used to select an item from a
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern