Lec 15 - Language & Mental Health - lecture

Lec 15 - Language & Mental Health - lecture - OT...

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Unformatted text preview: OT 441: Foundations of Occupation - Neuroscience Cognition: Language, Executive Functions, Emotions Outline 1. Language a. Disorders of language (spoken,written, reading, affective, etc). 1. Executive Functions 2. Emotions and Mental Health a. Structures and NTs b. HPA Axis c. Clinical correlations i. PTSD ii. Major depression iii. Schizophrenia What is Language? The use of complex abstract symbols to represent ones perception of the world to another Both innate and learned Anatomical Correlates Lateral surface of left hemisphere Planum temporale Pathway from auditory cortex Primary auditory area Secondary auditory area Wernickes area Arcuate fasciculus Brocas area Language: Key Structures Wernickes area: responsible for the recognition & comprehension of words Brocas area: responsible for producing coherent speech Arcuate fasciculus: the pathway connecting Wernickes area & Brocas area Damage can cause conduction aphasia Language Pathway Disorders of Language Aphasia Disturbance of language caused by an insult to specific regions of the brain Distinguished from dysarthria and dysphonia (mechanical disorders of speech) Most common cause of aphasia: TBI, CVA Symptoms of a patient may not always fall simply into one category Receptive (Wernickes) Aphasia Results from damage to Wernickes area (temporal lobe) Characterized by deficit in comprehension of language Affects expression of language also: Neologisms: Considered normal in children, but a symptom of thought disorder (psychosis/mental illness/schizophrenia) in adults Empty speech/word salad: Paraphrasia: Usually severe reading and writing problems Location: Possible a lesion to this area may affect somatosensory & motor areas can sometimes cause hemiplegia. Receptive (Wernickes) Aphasia The patient in the passage below is trying to describe a picture of a child taking a cookie. C.B. Uh, well this is the ... the /dd/ of this. This and this and this and this. These things going in there like that. This is /sen/ things here. This one here, these two things here. And the other one here, back in this one, this one /g/ look at this one. Examiner Yeah, what's happening there? C.B. I can't tell you what that is, but I know what it is, but I don't now where it is. But I don't know what's under. I know it's you couldn't say it's ... I couldn't say what it is. I couldn't say what that is. This shu-- that should be right in here. That's very bad in there. Anyway, this one here, and that, and that's it. This is the getting in here and that's the getting around here, and that, and that's it. This is getting in here and that's the getting around here, this one and one with this one. And this one, and that's it, isn't it? I don't know what else you'd want. CHH with Wernickes Aphasia?CHH with Wernickes Aphasia?...
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Lec 15 - Language & Mental Health - lecture - OT...

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