1-14

1-14 - OT 261 (Physiology for Occupational Therapists)...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 OT 261 (Physiology for Occupational Therapists) Spring 2010 Today’s Topics General cell structure Functions of cellular constituents Cell-cell interaction/communication Function of proteins
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Structure of a Generalized Cell Structure determines function If structure is changed, so is function
Background image of page 2
3 Fluid Mosaic Model Separates intracellular fluids from extracellular fluids Glycocalyx area abutting the cell that provides highly specific biological markers by which cells recognize one another contains glycoproteins and glycolipids
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Types of Membrane Proteins
Background image of page 4
5 Functions of Membrane Proteins
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 Functions of Membrane Proteins (cont.)
Background image of page 6
7 Membrane Junctions Tight Junction “impermeable” junction that encircles the cell prevent molecules from passing between adjacent cells
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8 Membrane Junctions Desmosome anchoring junction scattered along the sides of cells provide strong attachments (like rivets)
Background image of page 8
9 Membrane Junctions Gap junction a nexus that allows chemical substances to pass between cells great for cell-cell communication
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
10 Passive Membrane Transport: Diffusion Simple diffusion – lipid-soluble substances Diffuse directly through the lipid bilayer Does not require ATP i.e. steroids Channel-mediated facilitated diffusion – lipid- insoluble substances Diffuse through channels created by proteins Does not require ATP i.e. water and small ions Both of these processes require a CONCENTRATION GRADIENT
Background image of page 10
11 Passive Membrane Transport: Diffusion Carrier-mediated facilitated diffusion – large, lipid-insoluble molecules such as simple sugars Combine with protein carriers Only works if solute has concentration gradient Does not require ATP Binding of solute causes conformational change in protein carrier
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
12 Effect of Membrane Permeability on Diffusion and Osmosis (if permeable to water and solute)
Background image of page 12
13 Effect of Membrane Permeability on Diffusion and Osmosis (permeable only to water)
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
14 Passive Membrane Transport: Filtration The passage of water and solutes through a membrane by hydrostatic pressure Pressure gradient pushes solute-containing fluid from
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/02/2010 for the course OT 261 taught by Professor Howell during the Spring '07 term at USC.

Page1 / 43

1-14 - OT 261 (Physiology for Occupational Therapists)...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online