543 733 there is nothing very tricky here but the

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Unformatted text preview: 162] Understanding structure layout and alignment is very important for understanding how much storage different data structures require and for understanding the code generated by the compiler for accessing structures. This problem lets you work out the details of some example structures. A. struct P1 { int i; char c; int j; char d; }; i 0 c 4 j 8 d 12 Total 16 Alignment 4 B. struct P2 { int i; char c; char d; int j; }; i 0 c 4 d 5 j 8 Total 12 Alignment 4 C. struct P3 { short w[3]; char c[3] }; w 0 c 6 Total 10 Alignment 2 D. struct P4 { short w[3]; char *c[3] }; w 0 c 8 Total 20 Alignment 4 E. struct P3 { struct P1 a[2]; struct P2 *p }; a 0 Problem 3.24 Solution: [Pg. 170] This problem covers a wide range of topics: stack frames, string representations, ASCII code, and byte ordering. It demonstrates the dangers of out-of-bounds memory references and the basic ideas behind buffer overflow. A. Stack at line 7. p 32 Total 36 Alignment 4 712 +-------------+ | 08 04 86 43 | +-------------+ | bf ff fc 94 | +-------------+ | | +-------------+ | | +-------------+ | | +-------------+ | | +-------------+ | 00 00 00 01 | +-------------+ | 00 00 00 02 | +-------------+ APPENDIX B. SOLUTIONS TO PRACTICE PROBLEMS Return Address Saved %ebp <-- %ebp buf[4-7] buf[0-3] Saved %esi Saved %ebx B. Stack after line 10 (showing only words that are modified). +-------------+ | 08 04 86 00 | +-----...
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This note was uploaded on 09/02/2010 for the course ELECTRICAL 360 taught by Professor Schultz during the Spring '10 term at BYU.

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