Many microprocessor chips including alpha and the

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Unformatted text preview: an be grouped as bytes, with the most significant byte having bits ÜÛ ½ ÜÛ ¾ ÜÛ , the least significant byte having bits Ü Ü Ü¼ , and the other bytes having bits from the middle. Some machines choose to store the object in memory ordered from least significant byte to most, while other machines store them from most to least. The former convention—where the least significant byte comes first—is referred to as little endian. This convention is followed by most machines from the former Digital Equipment Corporation (now part of Compaq Corporation), as well as by Intel. The latter convention—where the most significant byte comes first—is referred to as big endian. This convention is followed by most machines from IBM, Motorola, and Sun Microsystems. Note that we said “most.” The conventions do not split precisely along corporate boundaries. For example, personal computers manufactured by IBM use Intel-compatible processors and hence are little endian. Many microprocessor chips, including Alpha and the PowerPC by Motorola can be run in either mode, with the byte ordering convention determined w...
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This note was uploaded on 09/02/2010 for the course ELECTRICAL 360 taught by Professor Schultz during the Spring '10 term at BYU.

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