7c - Structure 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Introduction Properties of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Microfabrication Technologies 3. Materials Slide: 2 © University of Utah • F. Solzbacher (2003) Structure 1. Introduction 2. Properties of solid state materials 3. Crystal structure 4. Semiconductor effects 5. Comparison of materials 6. Summary Microfabrication Technologies 3. Materials Slide: 3 © University of Utah • F. Solzbacher (2003) 1. Introduction Core MEMS materials are: Semiconductors Polymers/Plastics Metals Ceramics The majority of MEMS components today is made using Silicon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Microfabrication Technologies 3. Materials Slide: 4 © University of Utah • F. Solzbacher (2003) Structure 1. Introduction 2. Properties of solid state materials 3. Crystal structure 4. Semiconductor effects 5. Comparison of materials 6. Summary Microfabrication Technologies 3. Materials Slide: 5 © University of Utah • F. Solzbacher (2003) 2. Properties of solid state materials Solid state structure amorphus single crystal Poly crystalline [STZ Tübingen]
Background image of page 2
Microfabrication Technologies 3. Materials Slide: 6 © University of Utah • F. Solzbacher (2003) 2. Properties of solid state materials Aggregate state [STZ Tübingen] solid at 0 K solid at 293 K liquid gaseous plasma Microfabrication Technologies 3. Materials Slide: 7 © University of Utah • F. Solzbacher (2003) 2. Properties of solid state materials Semiconductor materials 1. Semiconductors are solid state materials with specific resistance at room temperature between metals and insulators/dielectric materials ( g = 10 -4 .. 10 12 G m) 2. Specific resistance depends strongly on crystal structure and impurities 3. 12 Elementary semiconductors, incl. Silicon and Germanium. 4. Silicon is the primary semiconductor material used for microfabricated devices (e.g. sensors and actuators) 5. Reason: no other semiconductor exhibits similar physical, mechanical and chemical properties with sufficiently developed processing technology 6. Compound semiconductors exist in a large variety of material combinations; only few are of importance for MEMS applications 7. Specific sensor applications (e.g. photoelectric sensors) require the use of compound semiconductors
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Microfabrication Technologies 3. Materials Slide: 8 © University of Utah • F. Solzbacher (2003)
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 14

7c - Structure 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Introduction Properties of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online