Civilization%20and%20Its%20Discontents%20%2827%20September%202007%29

Civilization%20and%20Its%20Discontents%20%2827%20September%202007%29

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H ISTORY 140/141 * F ALL 2007 C AROL S YMES Thursday, 27 September 2007 Civilization and Its Discontents: Daily Life, Decadence, and Dissent Q UESTIONS T O B E A DDRESSED IN L ECTURE How was the Roman Empire governed, and what was life like for its citizens? What were the Empire’s internal and external problems? Why did the Rhineland and Palestine become pressure points? How did the teachings of Jesus spread? T ERMS I NTRODUCED IN L ECTURE gospels ~ Greek: “good news” synoptic ~ “seeing with one eye” (Greek: syn + ops ) // gnostic ~ Greek: gnosis (“intuition”) evangelism ~ Greek: ev-angelos “a messenger sent forth” missionary ~ Latin: missus, “someone sent forth, a herald”’ A DDITIONAL S OURCES C ITED IN L ECTURE The political machinations of a Roman governor and a Roman client king (Luke 23:4-12): And Pilate said to the chief priests and the multitudes, “I find no crime in this man.” But they were urgent, saying: “He stirs up the people, teaching throughout all Judea, from Galilee as far as to Jerusalem.” When Pilate heard this, he asked whether the man were a Galilean. And when he learned that he belonged to Herod’s jurisdiction, he sent him over to Herod, who was himself at Jerusalem. When Herod
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Civilization%20and%20Its%20Discontents%20%2827%20September%202007%29

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