Medieval%20Politics%20and%20the%20Modern%20State%20%281%20November%202007%29

Medieval%20Politics%20and%20the%20Modern%20State%20%281%20November%202007%29

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H ISTORY 140/141 * F ALL 2007 C AROL S YMES Thursday, 1 November 2007 Medieval Institutions and the Origins of the Modern State Q UESTIONS TO B E A DDRESSED IN L ECTURE What new forms of government emerged in Europe during the twelfth century? How did the balance of power between secular and religious authorities begin to shift, and how did the Church under Innocent III redefine itself? What was Magna Carta? What did it mean in 1215 – and what does it mean to us now? According to Joseph Strayer, what are the four medieval institutions that make up the modern state? ADDTIONAL S OURCES C ITED IN L ECTURE Emperor Frederick I “Barbarossa” issues a statement of defiance to the papacy in 1155: We have long heard much about the wisdom and valor of the Romans: ‘There was, there was once , virtue in this republic.’ ‘Once,’ I say. . . . Your Rome – nay, ours also – has experienced the vicissitudes of time. . . . Do you wish to know the glory of your Rome? The worth of senatorial dignity? The impregnable disposition of the army? The virtue and discipline of the equestrian order . . . ? Behold our state. All these things are to be found with us. All these things have descended to us, together with the empire. Joseph Strayer (1904-1987), On the Medieval Origins of the Modern State (Princeton, 1970): Today, we take the state for granted. . . . In the world of today, the worst fate that can befall a man is to be stateless. . . . He has no rights, no security, and little opportunity. . . . [C]ertainly the Greek polis was a
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This note was uploaded on 09/02/2010 for the course HIST 141 taught by Professor Crowston during the Fall '06 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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Medieval%20Politics%20and%20the%20Modern%20State%20%281%20November%202007%29

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