COMM101_Winter08_Week2

COMM101_Winter08_Week2 - Comm 101: Winter 2008 Sections:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Comm 101: Winter 2008 Sections: 005, 006, 007 Erica Denise Williams, GSI Week 2 Notes Raymond Williams: Culture is Ordinary Culture —both a whole way of like (i.e. everyday life) and the forms of signification (i.e. media) that  circulate within a society (p. 91). Culture can be used to mean a whole way of life as well as to mean  the arts and learning (p. 93).  National culture —“an arena for thinking about the problem of ordinary culture within societies where  local, national and global meanings circulate and collide” (p. 91).  Structures of feeling —common culture that resonates across both the mixture of representations and  the experience of living culture.  This view offers a perspective from which to understand how culture  itself is saturated by a mass of representation (p. 92). Stuart Hall: Encoding, Decoding The four stage theory of communication (complex structure in dominance) —  production, circulation  (also called distribution or consumption), and reproduction (p.90). Each stage is relatively  autonomous, having its own limits and possibilities. The concept of relative autonomy allows Hall to  argue that polysemy is not the same as pluralism. Polysemy —messages can have multiple meanings and interpretations Pluralism —the are a plethora of messages but they are not open to any interpretation because the  construction of the messages in each stage limits the possibilities in the next stage  The traditional model for the process of communication  has been criticized for its linearity: sender  message   receiver (p. 91). This model doesn’t take into account the complex structure of relations.  However, Hall’s four stage theory does in fact take these complexities into account.  Events  can only be signified within the aural-visual forms of the televisual discourse (p. 92). In this  sense, an event must become a “story” before it can become a communicative event (p. 91). The television communicative process —The institutional structures of broadcasting are required to  produce a program within the normative practices and technical infrastructures; producers constructs  the message; The institution draws topics, agendas, events, and images from other sources within the 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course COMM 101 taught by Professor Jacobs during the Winter '07 term at University of Michigan.

Page1 / 4

COMM101_Winter08_Week2 - Comm 101: Winter 2008 Sections:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online