1.1 - 1 Looking at data: distributions- Displaying...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Looking at data: distributions- Displaying distributions with graphs Exploratory Data Analysis Individuals in sample DIAGNOSIS AGE AT DEATH Patient A Heart disease 56 Patient B Stroke 70 Patient C Stroke 75 Patient D Lung cancer 60 Patient E Heart disease 80 Patient F Accident 73 Patient G Diabetes 69 Spread sheet 1918 influenza epidemic Date # Cases # Deaths week 1 36 0 week 2 531 0 week 3 4233 130 week 4 8682 552 week 5 7164 738 week 6 2229 414 week 7 600 198 week 8 164 90 week 9 57 56 week 10 722 50 week 11 1517 71 week 12 1828 137 week 13 1539 178 week 14 2416 194 week 15 3148 290 week 16 3465 310 week 17 1440 149 19 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 9000 10000 w e e k 1 w e e k 3 w e e k Incidence Individuals Education level A Not HS grad B Advanced degree C Bachelors D HS grad E Some college F HS grad G Some college H HS grad Variables In a study, we collect informationdatafrom individuals . Individuals can be people, animals, plants, or any object of interest. A variable is a characteristic that varies among individuals in a population or in a sample. Example: age, height, blood pressure, ethnicity, income, The distribution of a variable tells us what values the variable takes and how often it takes these values. Two types of variables Variables can be either quantitative Something that can be counted or measured for each individual. Example: How tall you are, your age, your cholesterol level, the number of credit cards you own or categorical (qualitative). Something that falls into one of several categories. What can be counted is the frequency or proportion of individuals in each category. Example: Your blood type (A, B, AB, O), your hair color, your ethnicity, whether you paid income tax last tax year or not Two kinds of quantitative variables Discrete variables Continuous variables Ways to chart categorical data Bar graphs Pie charts Individuals Education level A Not HS grad B Not HS grad C Bachelors D HS grad E Some college F HS grad G Some college H HS grad Education...
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This note was uploaded on 09/04/2010 for the course STAT 131 taught by Professor Isber during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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1.1 - 1 Looking at data: distributions- Displaying...

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