Lecture 4

Lecture 4 - Lecture 4 Lecture 4 The longitudinal...

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Lecture 4 1 © Jeffrey Bokor, 2000, all rights reserved Lecture 4 The longitudinal magnification is of interest. For a given small shift of an object along the optic axis, how much does the image shift? We define the longitudinal magnification as: The longitudinal magnification is positive and the square of the transverse magnification Virtual Image For an object to the left of the lens, is negative . Since Then if , then is also negative. The light emerging from the lens appears to be coming from the object with height at distance behind the lens. d 2 d 2 d 1 d 1 m d 1 d 2 d 1 f +  fd 1 f d 1 f + 2 --------------------------------- = f 2 d 1 f + 2 -------------------- = m 2 = d 1 1 d 2 ----- 1 f -- 1 d 1 + = d 1 f d 2 d 2 d 1 h 2 h h 1 d 2
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Lecture 4 2 © Jeffrey Bokor, 2000, all rights reserved For an optical system not immersed in air The front and back focal lengths are not the same in this case front focal length: back focal length: lens law becomes: (show ) Refraction of light by a spherical surface (following Smith 2.4) Sign Conventions 1. Radius is positive when center of curvature is to the right of the surface
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Lecture 4 - Lecture 4 Lecture 4 The longitudinal...

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