Lecture 1 - Lecture 1 Lecture 1 Basic Properties of Light...

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Lecture 1 1 © Jeffrey Bokor, 2000, all rights reserved Lecture 1 Basic Properties of Light Light is described using 3 pictures - seemingly contradictory! Waves - Rays - Photons Waves [Reading Assignment: Hecht, Chapter 2 (most of this should be review), 3.2, 3.3, 3.4.4, 3.5, 3.6] A propagating “disturbance” in electric and magnetic field (simultaneously!) Example: At a fixed point in space, the electric field oscillates in time. At a fixed point in time, we see a wave train frozen. This is called a plane-wave because the field is constant everywhere in the x-y plane at a given z. Another way to draw this is The wavefront advances by a distance , in a time . So the velocity is . One of the many remarkable properties of light is it’s universal, constant speed: in vacuum The physics of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation is valid for arbitrary , . On Earth, we can generate, manipulate and/or detect EM waves with wavelength from ~100 km all the way down to . Usually we describe light by wavelength rather then frequency, except in the microwave and radio regions. EE x ˆ 2 ------ z 2 ft   cos = z t  t = z 0 t 0 == E x “wave-fronts” surface of constant “phase” or “phase-fronts” 1 f v distance/time f c 2.997 10 8 = m / s e c c f = f ~10 6 A
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Lecture 1 2 © Jeffrey Bokor, 2000, all rights reserved
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Lecture 1 - Lecture 1 Lecture 1 Basic Properties of Light...

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