Class 6 ASL DeafCulture_Weisenberg SP10 part 2

Class 6 ASL DeafCulture_Weisenberg SP10 part 2 - Deaf...

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Deaf Culture and American Sign Language (ASL) Language in the USA Dr. JC Weisenberg Part II
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Facial expression matters. Compare the ASL sentences for "I'm going to the restaurant " and " Are you going to the restaurant?" Questions are accompanied by arched eyebrows and an inquisitive look. “I 'm going to the restaurant " Please note that other variations could include NOW appearing sentence-initially, or even topic-comment structure (object, then verb) such as “Restaurant, I go”
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Word Order in ASL Primarily SVO However, often exhibits a ‘topic- comment’ structure such as O S V For ex. FATHER LOVES SON, or SON (marked by facial grammar indicating ‘topic’/obj’) FATHER LOVES ~ -- -- SON FATHER LOVES
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Yes and No Questions are accompanied by raised eyebrows. Are you going to the restaurant?" Interrogatives in ASL
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Interrogatives – WH words Who, What, Where, When, Why, What for (what reason?); How, How much? In ASL, a sentence which contains a WH- word must be accompanied by lowered (furrowed) eyebrows and a slight head tilt. Wh-signs appear at the end of the sentence, or can be repeated (copied) at the beginning and the end. Ex WHEN TWO-OF-US EAT WHEN? Or EAT TWO-OF-US WHEN? (‘When do we eat?’ or ‘When are we eating?’
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Linearity Most ASL sentence structure is based upon sequential thought. That is, if you talk about one event happening after another event, you would describe the first event and then the second. If you said in English: "I'm going to lunch after I finish this report" the direct sign translation would be:
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Linearity
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Are signs related to the meaning of the thing or idea they represent? Iconic signs - signs that reflect some aspect of the thing or idea being expressed. Arbitrary signs - no connection to the meaning of the word (the majority).
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Iconic Signs (a few examples) ‘tree’ ‘cat’ ‘night’ http:// www.handspeak.com/tour/index.php?dict =night ‘book’ http://www.handspeak.com/tour/index.php ‘drink’
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Arbitrary Signs ‘wrong’ ‘lousy’ ‘government’ http:// www.handspeak.com/tour/index.php?dict=government Other examples: sports, volunteer http://www.handspeak.com/
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Variation in ASL Prior to 1834, there were many completely unrelated versions of sign language around the country. Now most all deaf people use some variety of ASL. There is dialectal variation in ASL among northern/southern signers The sign for “Deaf” in Boston moves from the ear to the chin. In Kansas it’s from the chin to the ear. Signers from the south often use the sign for supper, a fist on the chin, while up north here we use dinner, a ‘D’ on the mouth or even the compound EAT+NIGHT. Southern signers use sign for
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This note was uploaded on 09/06/2010 for the course LIN 200 taught by Professor Julia during the Spring '10 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Class 6 ASL DeafCulture_Weisenberg SP10 part 2 - Deaf...

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