Week 9 final project - Terrestrial Resource Issue: Solid...

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Terrestrial Resource Issue: Solid Waste 1 Terrestrial Resource Issue: Solid Waste Melissa Krol SCI - 275 January 20, 2010 Instructor: Timothy S. Griffin, Esquire Axia College of the University of Phoenix
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Terrestrial Resource Issue: Solid Waste 2 Terrestrial Resource Issue: Solid Waste Terrestrial resources are resources of the land, which include mountains, valleys, plants, trees, and the land itself. This paper will focus on an environmental problem that affects not only land resources, but air and water resources as well. This problem not only affects every one of us but is caused by every one of us as well. The problem is solid waste, which can be broken down into two categories: municipal waste and non-municipal waste. Solid waste more commonly known as garbage or trash is any unwanted or discarded materials resulting from residential, commercial, agricultural, and household activities. This includes paper, empty food cans, glass, metal, plastic, cardboard, and any tool or appliance that cannot be fixed or is of no use to us. It is not uncommon to discard washers, dryers, stoves, air conditioners, computers, refrigerators, televisions, radios, drills, chain saws, and toxic materials such as anti freeze. It seems that we all feel the easiest thing to do with something when we are done with it is to throw it away, letting the trash collector haul it off. The trash hauled away by the trash collector is discarded in a hole in the ground and buried, these places are called landfills. Many years ago our trash was dumped in just a hole in the group, called open dumping, presently these holes are lined to try and prevent leakage into the ground. All of the items in trash take up space, much of it is recyclable and some dangerous to our health and the environment. This brings us to an additional breakdown of solid waste; hazardous and non- hazardous materials. Hazardous materials cause health problems to all living things on earth. These materials contain dangerous corrosive, explosive, reactive, and toxic chemicals. Items included in this category are computer, television sets, cell phones, radios, and batteries; these items contain corrosive and toxic chemicals that leak into the ground and end up in our water system. Paint cans, compressed gas cylinders, refrigerators, air conditioners, and aerosol cans contain gases
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Terrestrial Resource Issue: Solid Waste 3 that pollute our air supply. These are items we use and dispose of on a regular basis. We all live such fast lifestyles that we do not consider the consequences of what we throw away. Non-hazardous waste materials are things such as paper, cardboard, glass, food waste, aluminum, and wood. These items do not threaten the ecosystem or environment in a hazardous way. They do take up space in landfills attracting disease causing rodents, which in turn can be harmful to humans and other living organisms. A way to reduce the amount of solid waste is to implement the 3-R Principle: reduce,
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This note was uploaded on 09/06/2010 for the course ACC 220 acc-220 taught by Professor Unknown during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Week 9 final project - Terrestrial Resource Issue: Solid...

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