Diabetes - Diabetes Laura Davis 8/29/2010 According to Web...

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Diabetes Laura Davis 8/29/2010
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According to Web M.D (2010), diabetes is the most common endocrine disorder of the human body. There are three types of diabetes, type I, type II, and gestational. Type I diabetes, also called juvenile diabetes, strikes children, and young adults (American Diabetes Association, 1995-2010). Type II diabetes is more common in certain ethnic groups, and in older people. Gestational diabetes is only present during pregnancy and usually goes away after pregnancy; however some women will develop type II diabetes in later years (American Diabetes Association, 1995-2010). Type II diabetes is considered the most common of all diabetes types. Because type II diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, this is the type that will be discussed in detail. What is type II diabetes? Type II diabetes is a disease of the endocrine (hormone) system. In a normal working endocrine system, blood sugar levels stay consistent. In the case of diabetes, blood sugar levels fluctuate causing the body’s cells to keep from function properly (Web M.D., 2005-2010). Type II diabetes occurs when the body either does not produce enough insulin, or the body cannot use the insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone regulated by the endocrine system. Insulin helps the body store and uses the sugar from eaten food (Web M.D., 2005-2010). The body is made up of cells; these cells need energy that energy comes from food and drink. When food or drink is ingested that food is broken down into sugar called glucose. Glucose is then distributed through the bloodstream to the cells in which energy is used for daily use. Insulin is very important for the glucose levels found in the body. Insulin is produced and stored in the pancreas. Insulin is also stored in the liver. The pancreas constantly releases insulin in small amounts. This insulin pushes glucose into the body cells so there is always energy to feed the cells. When the body
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Diabetes is recognized by low and high blood glucose (sugar) levels. Currently there are several identifying risk factors in the development of type II diabetes. Not everyone will develop type II diabetes if he or she has any of all of these risk factors, but medical discoveries show the chance increases with more risk factors (Web, M.D. 2005-2010). The risk factors are as follows: 1. Family History-if a family member has diabetes, one is at high risk 2. 45 or older-chance increases with age 3. Race or ethnic background-certain race or ethnic background has higher risk 4. Hypertension-high blood pressure increases risk 5. Cholesterol levels-abnormal high or low levels increases risk 6. History of gestational diabetes-acquiring diabetes during pregnancy increases risk 7. Obesity-increases risk, at any age 8. Inactivity-increases risk Of these listed risk factors, half of them may be controlled to lessen the risk of acquiring diabetes.
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This note was uploaded on 09/06/2010 for the course HEALTH CAR HCA/240 taught by Professor Judyaycock during the Spring '10 term at Phoenix School of Law.

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Diabetes - Diabetes Laura Davis 8/29/2010 According to Web...

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