Nocturnal Eating - Nocturnal Eating Erin Roth and Carrie...

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Nocturnal Eating Erin Roth and Carrie Arnold
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Two types of Nocturnal Eating Nocturnal (night) Eating Syndrome  (NES) Sleep-related Eating Disorder   (SRED)
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NES-  Nocturnal eating syndrome NES was first noted in 1955 by Albert Stunkard M.D.  and colleagues. They described it as consuming most  of the days food in the late evening and into the night,  including nocturnal snacking, where individuals wake  from sleep to consume large amounts of food.  It is not very common in the general population: 0.4- 1.6%, but much more common in overweight and  obese persons and those seeking surgical weight loss:  6-6.4%.  (Stunkard, et al, 2008)
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Triad of symptoms Morning anorexia is lack of appetite in the morning,  often due to a feeling of fullness from the night eating,  or guilt or shame associated with eating the night  before  (sleep-deprivation.com) Evening hyperphagia is described as the consumption  of >  25% of daily calories after the evening meal  (Gluck  et. al, 2008) Sleep disturbances included waking in the middle of  the night due to hunger and the intense urge to eat  and the feeling of not being able to sleep without  eating large quantities of food >  3x/wk.  (Gluck et. al, 2008))
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SRED-  Sleep-Related Eating Disorder First described by Dr. Carlos H. Schenck and  colleagues in 1991 and shares many of the  same characteristics and symptoms as NES. However, a major difference is that SRED  patients arise from sleep (either fully or  partially) and have little or no recollection of  their eating episodes. Related to parasomnias  and other primary sleep disorders  (Winkleman, 2006)
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NES and SRED NES and SRED share many of same characteristics and are often linked in research studies. Both involve binging at multiple nocturnal awakenings, which is classified as consuming 25- 50% of the days calories after the evening meal. Both often include excess calorie intake or loss of control over consumption and are predominantly found in women, starting at a fairly young age. Both are associated with weight gain, sleep disorders, and shame over loss of control over food intake (Winkleman, 2006)
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Etiology and Psychopatholgy The actual causes of NES and SRED are  inconclusive, however studies have shown evidence  of endocrine abnormalities in patients with NES   (Winkleman, 2006) Research also shows the prevalence of psychological  distress, mental disorders, eating disorders and  increased BMI in many NES and SRED patients   (Gluck,  et. al 2008) Most of the research stated that there was a thin line  between the causes and symptoms of NES and  SRED and that some patient’s sleep disorders  exacerbate an eating disorder and some of the  patient’s eating disorders promote an increase in 
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course NUFS 124 at San Jose State University .

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Nocturnal Eating - Nocturnal Eating Erin Roth and Carrie...

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