Langerx_Suzanne - Suzanne Langer (1895-1985) "Virtual...

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Suzanne Langer (1895-1985) "Virtual Powers" taken from a chapter of that name, chapter 11, in Feeling and Form 1953 "born Dec. 20, 1895 , New York, N.Y., U.S. died July 17, 1985 , Old Lyme, Conn. née Susanne Katherina Knauth American philosopher and educator who wrote extensively on linguistic analysis and aesthetics. Langer studied with Alfred North Whitehead at Radcliffe College and, after graduate study at Harvard University and at the University of Vienna, received a Ph.D. (1926) from Harvard. She was a tutor in philosophy from 1927 to 1942, the year of her divorce…" “Langer, Susanne K.” Encyclopædia Britannica . 2003. Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service. 14 Oct, 2003 <http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=48190>. "Susanne K. Langer was born in Manhattan to German immigrant parents in 1895. She was raised in a rich intellectual and artistic environment. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Radcliffe in 1920; she completed her masters and doctorate in philosophy at Harvard in 1924 and 1926, respectively. For the next fifteen years, Langer taught philosophy at Radcliffe, Wellesley, Smith, and other colleges while raising two sons and writing her first scholarly works. In 1952, Langer was named chair of the Philosophy Department at Connecticut College, retiring in 1962 as professor emeritus. Langer’s first book was a study of myth and fantasy, The Cruise of the Little Dipper, and Other Fairy Tales (1924). Her first philosophical treatises were The Practice of Philosoph y (1930) and An Introduction to Symbolic Logic (1937). With the publication of Philosophy in a New Key: A Study in the Symbolism of Reason, Rite, and Art (1942) and Language and Myth (1946), her translation of the work of German philosopher Ernst Cassirer, Langer became known as a leading figure in the philosophy of art. From 1945 to 1950, she taught at Columbia University where she received a Rockefeller Foundation grant to write Feeling and Form: A Theory of Art (1953). Langer spent the last years of her life at her colonial home in Old Lyme where she dedicated
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course PHIL 66 at San Jose State University .

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Langerx_Suzanne - Suzanne Langer (1895-1985) &quot;Virtual...

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