Canadian_Journal_School_Psych

Canadian_Journal_School_Psych - http://cjs.sagepub.com...

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Unformatted text preview: http://cjs.sagepub.com Psychology Canadian Journal of School DOI: 10.1177/082957350201700105 2002; 17; 47 Canadian Journal of School Psychology Kimberly A. Lawless Pamela Robison-Awana, Thomas J. Kehle, Melissa A. Bray, William R. Jenson, Elaine Clark and is a Boy is a Boy Style as a Function of Academic Competence: Smart Girls are Different, But a Boy Self-Esteem, Gender-Role Perception, Gender-Role Orientation and Attributional http://cjs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/17/1/47 The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: Canadian Association of School Psychologists can be found at: Canadian Journal of School Psychology Additional services and information for http://cjs.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://cjs.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://cjs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/17/1/47 SAGE Journals Online and HighWire Press platforms): (this article cites 29 articles hosted on the Citations © 2002 SAGE Publications. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use or unauthorized distribution. at SAN JOSE STATE UNIV on May 1, 2008 http://cjs.sagepub.com Downloaded from Self-Esteem, Gender-Role Perception, Gender-Role Orientation and Attributional Style as a Function of Academic Competence: Smart Girls are Different, But a Boy is a Boy is a Boy Pamela Robison-Awana United Behavioral Clinics, Salt Lake City, Utah Thomas J. Kehle, Melissa A. Bray University of Connecticut William R. Jenson, Elaine Clark University of Utah Kimberly A. Lawless University of Illinois at Chicago Circle Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to: Dr. Thomas Kehle, Neag School of Education, University of Connecticut, 249 Glenbrook Road, U-64, Storrs, Conn. 06269. This investigation examined adolescent self-esteem, gender-role perception, gender-role orientation, and attributional style as a function of academic achievement by having 3 groups of 10th-, 11th-, and 12th-grade males and females (n = 540) respond to (a) a self-esteem inventory under 2 sets of instructions, a standard set and a set in which participants responded as they thought a member of the same age and grade but of the opposite gender would respond; and (b) to an attributional style and a gender-role inventory under the standard set of instructions. The results of the self-esteem inventory under standard instructions revealed a significant difference in favor of males. Under opposite-gender instructions, academically below average and average females ascribed significantly higher levels of self-esteem to males. Males at all academic levels ascribed significantly lower levels of self-esteem to females. However, females in the above average academic group constituted an exception in that they attributed significantly lower self-esteem to males....
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Canadian_Journal_School_Psych - http://cjs.sagepub.com...

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