MC_APA_Simpsons

MC_APA_Simpsons - The Simpsons and Reality 1 Running Head:...

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The Simpsons and Reality 1 Running Head: THE SIMPSONS AND REALITY The Simpsons and Reality: What the Show Says About Society Fname Lname San Jose State University
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The Simpsons and Reality 2 The American culture is made up of many different elements, and is changing and growing too rapidly for anyone to fully define or describe what it is. One could talk about democracy, the growing diversity, individuality, idealism – the list goes on. The media industry both reflects and influences American culture. With so many artists on the Billboard charts, movies becoming box office hits, and television shows with stellar ratings, it is no wonder media can show so many aspects of American life and become so influential among Americans. At their best, these forms of media are no longer merely for entertainment; they often relay messages to the audience, educating while they entertain. A number of popular songs today have lyrics that carry powerful messages. Movies and television shows have implications for today’s world. Even cartoons address real-life matters. Ever since its debut in 1989, The Simpsons has been one of America’s highest rated cartoon series. The show features a middle class family and a supporting cast of witty characters, all living in the seemingly typical town of Springfield. With distinctive characters, hilarious storylines, and clever themes, it is no wonder The Simpsons is still captivating audience attention in its 20 th season. The show goes beyond humor, though, which is one reason for its longevity. The Simpsons is more than just a high-rated cartoon series; it is a reflection of American society. Many are too busy laughing at the show’s humorous content to realize that it is actually a satirical parody of the American society and lifestyles. The show is full of elements intended to symbolize (and criticize) real life issues facing today’s world and how Americans perceive these issues and react to them. Together, the characters and storylines are set up to illustrate the behavior of Americans in dealing with their roles and responsibilities in life and the way they choose to deal with different issues.
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The Simpsons and Reality 3 Throughout its twenty seasons, the show has covered an extensive number of issues and themes. This paper will introduce various characters on the show and explain how their roles exemplify some of the more notable themes such as family values, religion, today’s education system, and the American work force. The show features a working class family living in a small town where everyone seems to know each other. Homer, the head of the family, works for a nuclear power plant, but spends more time in front of the TV and at the bars than he does working. Marge is the traditional housewife whose main role is to care for the family. Bart is the rambunctious “bad boy” whose most notable characteristic is his rebelliousness against authority. In contrast to her brother, Lisa is bright, loves to learn, and a left-wing activist at the age of eight. The youngest of the family,
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course COMM 100W at San Jose State.

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MC_APA_Simpsons - The Simpsons and Reality 1 Running Head:...

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