Introduction_to_Nursing_Theories

Introduction_to_Nursing_Theories - 1 Introduction to...

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1 Introduction to Nursing Theories By Lori Rodriguez, R.N. PhD. August 2007; Revised December 2007
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2 Objectives By the end of this learning module the student will be able to 1. Identify the four major components of nursing care that are addressed by most nursing mega-theories. 2. Differentiate between a megatheory, a theory, and a mid-range theory 3. Identify the nursing theory that has been adapted by SJSU School of Nursing 4. Name at least one benefit of using a nursing theory 5. Name at least one problem encountered when trying to use a nursing theory 6. Explain a metaphor or analogy that could be used to describe nursing theories 7. Explain in a brief statement the differences between a nursing theory and a mid-range nursing theory 8. Choose a nursing theory specific to their own interest and write a paper on it (assignment in N148).
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3 Introduction to Nursing Theories By Lori Rodriguez August 2007; Revised December 2007 When the word “theory” is mentioned to many practicing nurses, they shake their heads and say that they don’t like theory. This module is designed to explain nursing theories in a way that you will understand what they are, why they are used, and why some nurses become frustrated by them and don’t like them. By the time you read this you will hopefully be able to understand why someone might actually want to use a nursing theory in their practice, education, and research. Most simply a nursing theory is used as a way of organizing your thoughts around a specific topic. The mega-theories (also called grand theories) are just that, they provide a way of looking at the entire (or mega) topic of nursing. They address typically four components of nursing care: (1) the patient; (2) the environment; (3) health/illness; and (4) nursing. A mega- theory tends to be abstract, that is, not attached to specifics, sometimes obscure, and difficult to understand and apply. However, the broadness of the mega-theories can provide great depth in trying to understand nursing as a whole. For a practicing nurse the abstract nature of the theory can be frustrating. The nurse may have neither the time nor the desire to figure out how to apply the theory to an individual patient situation. But for the researcher a mega-theory may help to provide depth of study without spelling out specifics, allowing the researcher to explore and discover specifics. A mega theory attempts to establish the parameters of the identity of the nursing and distinguish the boundaries. Think of a theory as a map you get from Yahoo. It has the street names and is able to get you from here to there. It doesn’t have the trees, stop signs and signals, speed limits, areas where
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4 men are working in the road, and the detour that was just put in place. So too, nursing theories are like maps but they will not provide the subtleties of the trip or let you know where the potholes in the road are. For example, one theory, Henderson’s Complementary-Supplementary Model, says that patients have 14 different needs (see list below) and it is nursing’s job to meet
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course NURS 148 at San Jose State University .

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Introduction_to_Nursing_Theories - 1 Introduction to...

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