Attention and Awareness

Attention and Awareness - Attention and Awareness Evidence...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    Attention and Awareness: Evidence form Cognitive and Second Language Acquisition Research Bandar Al-Hejin Teachers College, Columbia University LLD 270 Second Language Acquisition  Dr. Swathi Vanniarajan
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    Key Points Attention and learning  Noticing Hypothesis and SLA
Background image of page 2
    Table of consciousness Schmidt (1994a) and Allport (1988)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    Consciousness Four dimensions of consciousness (Schmidt,1994a) Intention       a deliberateness on the part of the learner to attend to the  stimulus Attention     the detection of stimulus Awareness     subjective experience, associated with how you learn:  explicit versus implicit learning. (e.g. Adults SLA vs.  Children SLA) Control     the extent to which the language learner’s output is  controlled, requiring considerable or little mental processing  effort
Background image of page 4
    Attention ( Posner and Petersen) (1990) Three networks Alertness    a general state of readiness to receive input Orientation       the alignment of attentional resources to a particular  stimulus from a host of stimuli, e.g. disengaging form a  stimulus, shifting to a new one, and re-engaging with a new  stimulus. Detection     the cognitive registration of a stimulus
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    Attention in SLA Tomlin and Villia (1994) Limited capacity system     It is impossible to process all stimuli at any given time and the  limitation refers to the  duration of attention is given to a single  stimulus or a number of stimuli A process of selection      The amounts of incoming stimuli forces the attentional system to  be selective.  Controlled involved     A underlying assumption: some tasks require more processing  effort need a higher degree of attention than others.  Difficult  to perform two tasks if both require controlled processing at the  same time A process of coordination     attention is established, maintained, discontinued, and  redirected in order to perform different actions.
Background image of page 6
    Awareness Allport (1988) Three conditions   must to be met to be aware of a given experience Cognitive Change     A person must show a behavioral or cognitive change as a result  of the experience Report the experience      A person must report that s/he was aware of the experience at  the time it took place Describe the pattern     A person must be able to describe the experience Example: a person acquires past tense, (-ed) 
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 22

Attention and Awareness - Attention and Awareness Evidence...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online