Chapter2_Notes

Chapter2_Notes - Every biogeographer should be familiar...

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Every biogeographer should be familiar with three important biological hierarchies: the taxonomic hierarchy, the ecological hierarchy, and the trophic hierarchy
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Taxonomy is the subdiscipline of biology concerned with the classification and naming of organisms.Taxonomy is also known as systematics when the main goal is to determine the evolutionary relationship between groups of organisms. What is the difference between a species and a genus? It is recognized that genera of plants and animals contain organisms that are related but are consistently distinguishable on the basis of their morphology. In addition, many of these taxa, though members of the same genus, cannot interbreed. These different members of a genus are species.
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There remains much debate among scientists as to just how a species should be defined. Three main definitions are in use today. The phylogenetic species concept identifies a species as a group of sexually reproducing organisms that share at least one diagnostic character that is present in all members of the species but absent in
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Chapter2_Notes - Every biogeographer should be familiar...

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