Viscosity Report - Viscosity Measurement A report on an...

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Viscosity Measurement A report on an experiment performed for ME 120 Experimental Methods Laboratory San Jose State University Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Report by: Laboratory Date: March 16, 2009 Report Date: April 6, 2009
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Abstract This report is intended to explain an experiment performed to determine the viscosity of butcher oil as a function of temperature and to determine weather the oil was a Newtonian or non-Newtonian fluid. We used a rotating disc spindle viscometer to measure the viscosity. The viscosity test was performed in two different conditions in which one we kept the temperature constant and varied the speed of the spindle, and the second we kept the speed constant and varied the temperature of the fluid. From the results obtain we found that the viscosity is strongly dependent on temperature and the butcher oil used on this experiment was a Newtonian fluid. . 2
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Background and Objectives The resistance opposing the movement of an object through a fluid is known as viscosity. The higher the viscosity the greater the shearing force the object will experience opposing its movement. Different fluids have different viscosities depending on weather they fall in the categories of Newtonian or non-Newtonian fluids. The viscosity of a fluid is strongly dependent on temperature and is one of the important factors to consider as well as the shearing rate and geometry of the spindle being used to performed the experiment. This experiment was done with the following objectives: Determine if the fluid given is a Newtonian or Non-Newtonian fluid Determine the viscosity of the fluid as a function of temperature Understand the different terminology related to viscosity Learn to operate and take data using a rotating disc spindle viscometer The fluid in question was a light butcher oil which we expect to be in the category of Newtonian fluids. A rotating spindle viscometer was used to perform the experiment. The spindle used does not allow to get a direct measurement of the shear rate and shear stress due to its geometry, rather measurements of torque and angular velocity were used to analyze the behavior and properties of the fluid. Procedure/Apparatus and Experimental Results This experiment was performed using a Brookfield viscometer with rotating disc type spindle. The following is a list of items needed to complete the experiment. Rotating spindle type viscometer provided Spindle set Butcher Oil to measuring the viscosity Water heating apparatus Wingather32 software to collect data 3
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Before any measurements are taken we let the viscometer warm up for at least ten minutes. Making sure the viscometer is level and is zeroed we replace the spindle and inputed the respective spindle code into viscometer. Using the up and down keys select
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