eeWritingResearch2

eeWritingResearch2 - Writing a Research Report If research...

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    Writing a Research Report Writing a Research Report If research was not “written up,” did it really  If research was not “written up,” did it really  occur? occur?
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    Writing a Research Report Academic sociologists conduct research to discover facts,  truths, and explanations about the social world. They write research reports to convey theirs and others’  research findings.   The point is to provide useful information to others. Library research refers to gathering information that others have  generated. Primary research refers to generating information through data  collection, analysis, and reporting findings.
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    Writing a Research Report Sociologists’ articles, papers, or research reports convey:  Facts and/or theories others in the research community  generated (research reviews) Facts and/or theories the research community generated  and one’s own findings generated from a research project (research  article or book) And rarely, only one’s findings generated from a research  project (applied research)
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    Writing a Research Report A sociological article, paper, or report generally covers  only one important topic of interest and conveys evidence  and interpretations of evidence. Research reports are NOT creative writing, opinion  pieces, poems, novels, letters, musings, memoirs, or  interesting to read.
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    Writing a Research Report A sociological article, paper, or report generally takes a structure or form that seems  difficult but is intended to help make reading it or using it for research quick and  efficient. A research report has seven components: 1. Abstract or Summary 2. Introduction 3. Review of Literature 4. Methods 5. Results 6. Conclusions and Discussion 7. References Note:  Qualitative research reports will vary from what is presented here.
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    Writing a Research Report A research report has seven components: 1. Abstract or Summary The abstract or summary tells the reader very briefly what the main points and findings of the paper are. This allows the reader to decide whether the paper is useful to them. Get into the habit of reading only abstracts while searching for papers  that are relevant to your research. Read the body of a paper only when you think it will be useful to you.
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    Writing a Research Report A research report has seven components: 1.  Abstract or Summary—an example
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    Writing a Research Report A research report has seven components: 1. Introduction The introduction tells the reader what the topic of the paper 
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eeWritingResearch2 - Writing a Research Report If research...

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