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Comm._20_ADAPTING_YOUR_SPEECH_TO_A_SPECIFIC_AUDIENCE

Comm._20_ADAPTING_YOUR_SPEECH_TO_A_SPECIFIC_AUDIENCE -...

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ADAPTING YOUR SPEECH TO A SPECIFIC AUDIENCE Favorable Audience (Emphasis on Pathos) Remind the audience why they agreed with you and motivate them to action. Use emotional appeals; appeal to their values and needs. Expand on your call to action; offer several alternatives, and have them make a commitment and encourage them to get others involved. Make use of personal experiences; be creative, involved the audience by asking them questions and letting them respond, and use humor. You want to strengthen the audience attitude with a well-prepared and well organized speech. (Don’t get over confident and lazy.) Neutral Audience (Use a balance of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos) There are different reasons why an audience might be neutral: Uninterested audience: Work at getting their attention. Focus on how the issue affects them. Uninformed audience: Explain the issue, clarify confusing points. Use a lot of examples, definitions. For an informed, but undecided audience:
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Unformatted text preview: Acknowledge the other side and then refute it. Include some new arguments or information. Your credibility is critical in this case. Unfavorable Audience (Emphasize Logos and Ethos, use Pathos cautiously) • Extensive evidence; organization, sound reasoning are important • Use expert testimony, cite sources carefully • Make sure your points have good evidence • Stress common ground, win their hearts if not their minds. • Set realistic goals: Don’t expect to change their minds as much as changing their perspective Prioritize your goals; focus on a couple of key points • Refute the opposing arguments without being judgmental and sarcastic. • Acknowledge the opposing points of view, and then refute it. • Unfavorable audiences are usually skeptical of emotional appeals. • Although you don’t want to be combative, stay firm in your position • Don’t incite your audience to anger, and don’t use any name calling....
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