Updated Incorporating Sources Fairly and Properly

Updated - Incorporating Sources Fairly and Properly Avoiding Plagiarism Overview MLA is the format you'll use in English classes but be prepared to

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Incorporating Sources Fairly and Properly, Avoiding Plagiarism Overview : MLA is the format you’ll use in English classes, but be prepared to learn other systems based on the expectations of the audience and the forum where the writing is printed. It’s all part of establishing your credibility as a writer. Below I’ve included the most basic principles. For further details (including recent updates in MLA format), see the models in your textbook and the SJSU Writing Center website: Home Writing Center: http://www.sjsu.edu/writingcenter/ How to use MLA: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/12/ Plagiarism: http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/plagiarism.html 1. Never, never, never hang a quote in your paragraph all by itself. Always use a “signal phrase” or “identifying tag” to tell your reader where the idea or quotation is from, and choose the phrase carefully for clarity and grace. Examples of signal phrases: “According to one historian,” “Mary Tannen argues,” “Other sociologists
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course ENGL 1B at San Jose State University .

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