ViscosityMeasLab

ViscosityMeasLab - Viscosity Measurement Objectives for the...

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Viscosity Measurement Objectives for the student: 1. Learn to operate and take data with a rotating spindle-type viscometer 2. Investigate 10W-30 oil is a Newtonian or non-Newtonian fluid 3. Determine the viscosity of 10W-30 motor oil as a function of temperature Introduction Rheology is defined as the science of the deformation and flow of matter (BSR, 1998). It is important for Mechanical Engineers especially dealing with fluid flow and tribology (the science of lubrication). One physical quantity important in the rheology of fluids is viscosity. Viscosity is defined as the ratio of shear stress to shear rate in the fluid. A fluid for which viscosity is constant at all shear rates is called a ‘Newtonian’ fluid. Examples of Newtonian fluids include: water, sugar solutions, glycerin, silicone oils, light-hydrocarbon oils, air and other gases (Schlumberger, 2002). A fluid, whose viscosity is not constant, but varies as a function of shear rate is called a ‘non-Newtonian’ fluid. Examples of non-Newtonian fluids are drilling fluids, some kinds of oils, some kinds of paints, polymer melts, etc. A good overview of the most common types of non-Newtonian fluid behaviors is given in the Brookfield publication “More Solutions to Sticky Problems”, http://www.brookfieldengineering.com/support/documentation/index.cfm. While many lubricating oils are Newtonian, their viscosities are highly temperature dependent. It is important to know the viscosity and how it varies with temperature in the design of lubrication systems, fluid transport, etc. This lab will introduce the student to one method of making viscosity measurements. Theory Several sources that you may find helpful for the theoretical background on viscosity are: http://www.phys.virginia.edu/classes/311/notes/fluids2/node2.html , http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/physics/DynamicViscosity.html , http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/pfric.html#vis , http://www.brookfieldengineering.com/support/viscosity/index.cfm , your fluids textbook, or your machine design textbook
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ViscosityMeasLab - Viscosity Measurement Objectives for the...

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