04-20-10 - COMM 40 Tuesday, April 20 Agenda Check-in...

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COMM 40 Tuesday, April 20
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Agenda Check-in Current Event Presentation by Tenneal Satire Overview of Speech 2 Final Exam Options Looking Ahead
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Satire Humor is an important tool of argumentation and persuasion. In satire, an issue needs to be held up to examination by means of ridicule or irony WITH the intent to bring about improvement. Although satire is usually meant to be funny, the purpose of satire is not to make people laugh, but to attack something using wit.
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Research on Humor O’Connell (1960) breaks humor down to three genres: Humor Wit Nonsense Young and Frye (1966) added Sex Humor For Satire Speech (and Parliamentary Debate), we will be employing wit.
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Research on Wit Gruner (1996) states that wit is likely to (a) have serious purpose, (b) deal more with real events, (c) be relatively more logical in method, (d) be intended, usually, for a relatively specific audience and occasion, and (e) deal in subject matter of limited theme or scope, Whereas humor is (a) more likely to be content "to be,” without serious purpose, (b) more likely to deal with fantasy, (c) more likely to be alogical, imaginative in method, (d) more likely to be intended for all audiences of all times, and (e) more concerned with "timeless” themes.
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Research on Wit (cont.) Wit is comprised of: Irony Satire Ridicule Wit springs from a serious motive “Wit is designed to ridicule folly or show scorn for something” Humor is used as a part of wit, but does not stand by itself
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Research on Wit (cont.) Taylor (2001) warns “Too much humor, even if
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course COMM 40 at San Jose State University .

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04-20-10 - COMM 40 Tuesday, April 20 Agenda Check-in...

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