EDTE_162_Syllabus - San Jos State University College of...

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Unformatted text preview: San Jos State University College of Education Department of Elementary Education EDTE 162: Meeting the Needs of Second-Language Learners Spring Semester 2004 Class Hours: Tuesday 1600-1850 Instructor: Alexander Sapiens, Ph. D. Classroom: SH 346 Code Number: 22220 Office: SH 337 Section: 03 Office Hours: Monday & Tuesday 1400-1600, Wednesday 08000900, or by appointment Units: 3 Telephone: (408) 924-3753 Email: asapiens@email.sjsu.edu FAX: (408) 924-3775 SYLLABUS COLLEGE OF EDUCATION SHARED VISION: A vision is a destination, but one which defines a journey, not a fixed point on a conceptual map. The College of Education faculty holds that excellence and equity matter that each is necessary, and neither is sufficient in the absence of the other. Consequently, we are a learning community of practitioners/scholars in continuous development, dialogue and inquiry that enable us to revisit, review and revise our practice in response to changing circumstances and to model and inspire that dialogue for colleagues and students. Equity speaks initially to access and ultimately to outcomes. As a College, we work and prepare educators to work, both at the instructional and policy-making levels, to ensure that every child has the opportunity to benefit from available educational resources. Our College works toward equity in action, i.e., equity not only by policy, but through process and practice. Excellence in a democratic society actualizes each student's unique potential as an individual and as a member of a diverse community. Excellence recognizes the respect each of us must show for others as we reach for our own success. Excellence involves knowledge and skills with a commitment to life-long curiosity, imagination, and learning. COLLEGE OF EDUCATION MISSION: The mission of the College of Education at San Jos State University is to prepare educators who have the knowledge, skills, dispositions, and ethics that ensure equity and excellence for all students in a culturally diverse, technologically complex, global community. The policies and practices of the College of Education at San Jose State University are based on the belief that teaching in a democracy requires and must ensure that Students have access to an excellent and equitable education; educators at every level have knowledge of their subject matter and their students value and engage in ethical practice and excellent pedagogy, and develop dispositions and habits of mind that ensure that all students have equitable access to an excellent education. stakeholders be involved in the collegial community and engaged in the professional Conversation and decision making that delineates standards, assigns resources, guide program design, and reward accomplishment in the College. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Teachers need to understand the nature of language (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, etc.), how language is acquired and how literacy development builds on and intertwines with oral language development across a variety of sociocultural settings. Furthermore, teachers need an understanding of how oral language uses in the classroom relate to, promote, and enhance reading and writing development among linguistically and culturally diverse students, including mainstream, monolingual English speakers. EDTE 162 presents current research and theory on relationships between oral and written language development and use from infancy through adolescence among various language and cultural groups in the United States. Classroom 2 implications are drawn from the research and current curriculum innovations such as whole language, cooperative learning and process approaches to reading and writing are discussed in relation to research and theory presented in class. Concurrent with studies of oral language development and use, the relationship between oral language and written language will be examined. This course builds on advances in the fields of child language, psycholinguistics, and sociolinguistics. Focusing on studies related to first and second language children and students, this course reviews language development theory and research and relates these to today's views on "developmentally appropriate practice" in schools. Given the linguistic and cultural diversity among students, a major goal of the course is to describe not only what is known about universals in language development, but to explain issues related to language differences in terms of dialect and second language acquisition. While language issues form the central focus of the course, these issues are discussed within the sociocultural contexts of language use in the home, family, community and, most importantly, the school. Reviewing research on language development in social context, will help you understand what research has to say about the language development of diverse students. Through such understanding, you will be better prepared to make developmentally appropriate educational decisions. This course will explore the sociolinguistic and psycholinguistic aspects of bilingualism and bilingual education. A theoretical rationale for bilingual education will be developed that includes study and use of the primary language, ELD, SDAIE, and English language mainstream instruction.. Legal bases impacting the instruction of English learners will be explored. This course meets the Commission on Teacher Credentialing requirement that the program include a minimum of three semester units of bilingual education coursework. NCATE Standards This course responds to National Commission for Accreditation of Teacher Education Standards (NCATE), as well as the California Standards for the Teaching Profession (CSTP) and the new standards for teacher performance approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC). Objectives in bold faced type are from the California Standards for the teaching profession (CSTP). Bulleted objectives in plain type are from the new CCTC standards. Bulleted objectives in italics are instructor developed. The interface with NCATE standards is described at the end of the section. Engaging and supporting all students in learning: building on students prior knowledge, using a variety of instructional strategies and resources that respond to students diverse needs, actively engaging all students * Develop an understanding of the philosophy design, goals, and characteristics of school-based organizational structures designed to meet the needs of English learners. * Explain the dimensions of language as both a system for communication and a marker of cultural and ethnic identity. * Apply materials, methods and strategies for English language development that are responsive to students assessed levels of English proficiency. * Describe dual language programs and identify their potential strengths and weaknesses. Planning instruction and designing learning experiences for all students: drawing on students backgrounds, prior knowledge, development and interests. Establishing challenging learning goals for all students based on students' experiences, language, development and home and school expectations. * Explain the phonological and morphological structure of the English language. * Explain the factors and processes that lead to language variety and change. * Acquire knowledge of linguistic development, first and second language acquisition and how first language literacy connects to second language development. * Use language acquisition theory to develop approaches that support second language learners in both second language acquisition and learning in the content areas. * Apply systematic instructional strategies designed to make grade-appropriate curriculum content accessible to English learners. 3 Assessing student learning: Using information from a variety of sources to plan and adjust learning opportunities that promote academic learning and personal growth for all students. * Evaluate the complexities of defining and assessing language ability. * Identify issues related to assessing the educational achievement of second language learners. * Articulate the purposes, content and uses of California's English Development Standards, and English Language Development Test. Developing as a professional educator: Communicating effectively with families and involving them in student learning and the school community, utilizing community resources to support student learning. * Incorporate the importance of students' family and cultural backgrounds and experiences Into the curriculum. * Explain how sociocultural factors and sociolinguistic differences between home and school may affect a student's experience of school and instruction. * Explain the nature and history of language restrictionism in the United States in general and California, in particular. * Articulate relevant state and federal laws pertaining to the education of English learners. NCATE Standards: This course requires students to demonstrate competencies in keeping with NCATE standards as described in: Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge Skills and Disposition Standard 1, Section 2 requires that teacher candidates reflect an understanding of pedagogical content knowledge delineated in professional, state and institutional standards. Standard 1, Section 3 requires that teacher candidates develop meaningful learning experiences to facilitate learning for all students; reflect on their practice and make necessary adjustments to enhance student learning; know how students learn and how to make ideas accessible to them, and consider school, family, and community contexts in connecting concepts to students' prior experience. Standard 4: Diversity Standard 4, Section 1 requires that the curriculum help students to demonstrate knowledge skills, and dispositions related to diversity. COURSE OBJECTIVES: Standard 13 The teacher candidate will be able to: 1. Examine the changing demographics in the schools of California and 13h the implications of those changes for instruction. 2. Articulate the philosophy, design, goals, and characteristics of school-based 13a organizational structures designed to meet the needs of English learners including programs for English language development (ELD) and their relationship to the state-adopted reading/language arts student content standards and framework. 3. Describe the basic processes and stages of the acquisition of English as a first 13d (L1) and second language (L2), understand how L1 literacy affects L2 development, & explain implications for elementary and secondary school instruction. 4. Describe ELD among L1 and L2 learners as it occurs in later childhood and 13f adolescence, and draw implications for instruction. 5. Use materials, methods, and strategies for ELD that are responsive to students' 13b assessed levels of English proficiency, and that lead to the rapid acquisition of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in English comparable to those of their peers. 6. Interpret and use appropriate measures of English learners for initial, progress 13g monitoring, and summative assessment for language development and for content knowledge in the core curriculum. 7. Explain and apply the purposes, content & uses of California ELD standards 13g & CELDT. 8. Use and evaluate instructional practices that promote ELD including management 13e 4 of first and second languages, classroom organization, classroom interaction, and participation by specialists and paraprofessionals. 9. Use systematic instructional strategies designed to make grade-appropriate or advanced curriculum content comprehensible to English learners. 10. Critically discuss education/research projects that have aimed to tailor instruction to sociocultural patterns in the home and community and the role of students' family backgrounds and experiences to improve diverse students' school performance. 11. Explain relevant state and federal laws pertaining to the education of English learners, and how they impact student placements and instructional programs. 12. Examine several theories and approaches to bilingual education, including their treatment of ethnicity, culture, class, race, and gender and their implications for school practices. 13. Examine principles of educational equity and analyze the implementation of those principles in curriculum content and instructional practices. 14. Develop orientations and skills enhancing their ability to interact with and prepare all students to become equally effective participants in a multilingual pluralistic society. 15. Recognize criteria of effective ELD unit plans and design lessons that are comprehensible to English language learners (ELLs). COURSE TEXTBOOK: Peregoy, Suzanne & Boyle, Owen, 2001, Reading, writing, and learning in ESL: A resource book for K-12 teachers (3rd ed.). White Plains, N.Y.: Longman. Candau, Debbie et. al., 2002. Intel Teach to the Future with support from Microsoft Guide, San Jose, California: Intel Corporation Dresser, Roco & Sapiens, Alexander, 2003. EDTE 162 Course Reader will be made available through Maple Press. TOPICS TO BE COVERED: Day Date 1 Feb 3 Topic Reading Course Objective 1, 2 13f 13h 13c Orientation Section A: Demographics Demographics Examine the changing demographics in California schools and the implications of those changes for instruction Feb 10 Section B: Definitions Relationship between ELD, SDAIE, Mainstream Instruction and Bilingual Education Examine theories and approaches to bilingual education, including their treatment of ethnicity, culture, class, race, and gender and their implications for school practices. Define bilingual education to include ELD, SDAIE, mainstream instruction, PLD, and subject matter taught through PL. Ch 1, P&B English Language Learners in School 3 Feb 17 MLK Jr. Library, Literature Review Legal Standards Section D: Legal Standards Explain the legal foundations of dual language instruction and ELD at the state and federal levels. Proposition 227 & Title III. AB 537. Discrimination. Feb 24 Structure of Language Section E: Structure of Language 2 2, 12 1,2,11 4 3, 4 5 Explain the phonological and morphological structure of the English language Explain the factors and processes that lead to language variety and change 5 Mar 2 Module 1 Unit Portfolio (SH 431) 2, 5, 9 CA Curriculum Standards and ELD Standards Instructional Objectives Section C: Instructional Objectives and 2,7,9, 15 ELD Standards ELD Standards CA Curriculum Standards Incorporate ELD Standards and California curriculum standards into unit plan. Review the ELD standards and design lessons that incorporate ELD standards. Recognize criteria of effective ELD lesson plans. Design lessons that are comprehensible to English language learners. Language Learning Section F: Language Learning Theories Acquire knowledge of linguistic development, first and second language acquisition and how first language literacy connects to second language development Use language acquisition theory to develop approaches that support second-language learners in both second language acquisition and learning in the content areas Ch. 2, P&B Second Language Acquisition Module 2 Locating Resources for Unit Portfolio (SH 431) Creating Student Multimedia Presentations 3, 4 6 Mar 9 7 Mar 16 Learning Theories Section G: Learning Theories Understand and use systematic instructional strategies designed to make grade-appropriate curriculum content accessible to English learners Ch. 3, P&B Classroom Practices for English Learner Instruction Module 3 Creating Student Multimedia Presentations (SH 431) Mar 23 Cognitive Theories of Section J: Cognitive Theories of 5, 12, 15 Bilingual Education Bilingualism Examine theories and approaches to bilingual education, including their treatment of ethnicity, culture, class, race, and gender and their implications for school practices. Develop orientations and skills enhancing their ability to interact with and prepare all students to become equally effective participants in a multilingual pluralistic society Bilingual Education Section I: Instructional Models 4, 8, 12, 13, 15 Reflect on the values, assumptions, and principles of dual language education in a democratic society and develop their own personal philosophy for guiding their teaching practices. Identify key components for the design and implementation of a dual language curricula and evaluate instructional materials Apr 6 Literacy Section J: Literacy 2, 3, 8, 9 Evaluate classroom arrangements and interaction that will effectively foster reading and language learning. Explain the philosophy, design, goals, and characteristics of school-based organizational structures designed to meet the needs of English learners including programs for English language development (ELD) and their relationship to the state-adopted reading/language arts student content standards and framework. Describe the basic processes and stages of the acquisition of English as 8. 9 6 a first (L1) and second language (L2), understand how L1 literacy affects L2 development, & explain implications for elementary school instruction. Describe ELD among L1 and L2 learners as it occurs in later childhood and adolescence, and draw implications for instruction. Use materials, methods, and strategies for ELD that are responsive to students' assessed levels of English proficiency, and that lead to the rapid acquisition of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in English comparable to those of their peers. Ch. 4, P & B Oral Language Development in L2 Acquisition Ch. 5, P & B Emergent Literacy: English Learners Beginning to Write & Read 8 Apr 13 Cooperative Learning Section L: Cooperative Learning 13, 14 Differentiated Instruction & Complex Instruction Engage in cross-cultural study and experience with successful approaches to the education of linguistically and culturally diverse students. Examine principles of educational equity and analyze the implementation of those principles in curriculum content and instructional practices. Module 7 Creating Teacher Support Materials (SH 431) Apr 20 Assessment Section H: Assessment & CELDT Evaluate the complexities of defining and assessing language ability Identify issues related to assessing the educational achievement of second language learners Articulate the purposes, content and uses of California's English Development Standards, and the California English Language Development Test (CELDT) Interpret and use appropriate measures of English learners for initial Progress monitoring, and summative assessment for language development and for content knowledge in the core curriculum. Apr 27 Ch. 6, P&B Ch. 3, P&B May 4 Ch. 7, P&B Module 9 English Learners and Process Writing Classroom Practices for English Learner Instruction: Group Work Reading & Literature Instruction for English Learners Putting Unit Portfolios Together (SH 431) 2, 4,5, 6, 7 9 10 11 12 May 11 Parent Involvement Section N: Parent Involvement Critically discuss education/research projects that have aimed to tailor instruction to sociocultural patterns in the home and community and the role of students' family backgrounds and experiences to improve diverse students' school performance. Module 9 Putting Unit Portfolios Together (SH 431) 2, 4,5, 6, 7 May 18 Module 10 Showcasing Portfolios 2, 5, 6, 7. 13 14 May 25 Final Examination Reviewed. Tuesday, 1715 1915, SH 346 7 METHOD OF EVALUATION GRADE: The grade for this course will be reported as a letter grade: A, B, C, D, F, or I. The grade of "I" must be requested before the last day of instruction. The request for an "I" must be initiated by the student in writing. In order to request an incomplete, you must meet two conditions: (1) be progressing satisfactorily in the class; and (2) successfully complete 75% of the course requirements. Second Language History. 1-2 page description of you and your family (spouse & children) in terms of the second languages studied, acquired and /or spoken. What was the context in which those second (and third) languages were developed, used, or lost. How have you personally developed and maintained two languages. Describe your second language skills and how you hope to maintain and/or develop them. Due on February 17. Course Objective 15% 1, 4, 10 10% Review of Articles from Education Journals. Two articles dealing with 12, 13 Bilingual Education from educational journals dated from 1992 to present. The reviews must be typewritten and may not exceed one page in length. Each review will follow a prescribed format which includes a citation, description and personal critique or comment. The reviews may be submitted one at a time or both together. Both article reviews must be focused on a common theme dealing with bilingual education or ethnic, racial, cultural or linguistic diversity in public schools. You are encouraged to use the SJSU library web page: http://library.sjsu.edu and electronic journals at http://library.sjsu.edu/database/onlineJournals/inlsIndex.html. Due on March 23. Class Presentation. Teams of 2-3 students will make class presentations on parts of the assigned chapter or the supplementary readings provided. These presentations will be no shorter than 30 minutes and no longer than 45 minutes. Summaries or outlines may be provided to classmates. Students will be assigned a group grade. Students need to volunteer for articles or chapters and form work teams by February 17. After that date, remaining assignments will be made by the instructor. 2, 3, 4, 5 6, 7, 8, 9 10 25% 20% Unit Plan. 2, 3, 4, 5, A two-week unit plan that is grade appropriate for a selected grade 6, 7, 8, 9, level (K-12) that incorporates technology-enhanced lessons presented 10 by collaborative team or individual. The unit plan will include at least one website, curriculum-framing questions (essential questions and unit questions), student objectives/learning outcomes, targeted state frameworks/content standards/benchmarks, procedures, and assessment as indicated in the unit plan template (Module 1.7-1.8) (20%) The unit plan (20%) will be due on May 11. The PowerPoint Presentation must be an overview of the unit plan or an introduction covering the main points of the unit plan. It must be grade appropriate and comprehensible to English learners. The PowerPoint presentation will include at least 10 slides and no more than 15, sound, graphics, and a web link. The accompanying PowerPoint presentation (10%) will be due on May 5. The PowerPoint presentations will be showcased or shared on December 9.(10%) Due on May 18. Group grades are assigned. 10% 8 20% Final Examination. Handed out on April 20, 2004. Due on May 18, 2004. Returned and reviewed on Tuesday, May 25, 2004, 1515-1715. Always make backup copies of any papers or examinations submitted. Calculation of Grade: Letter Maximum Grade Points Points Possible 1. Language History 2. Two Journal Article Reviews 3. Class Presentation 4. Unit Plan 4. Power Point Presentation 5. Final Exam 6. Total Points 7. Letter Grade for the Course Calculation of Grade: A+ 100 A 99 - 95 A94 - 91 B+ 90 - 88 B 87 - 83 B82 - 80 C+ C CD+ D D79 - 77 76 - 73 72 - 70 69 - 67 66 - 63 62 - 60 15% 10% 25% 20% 10% 20% ________________________15_____ ________________________10____ ________________________25____ 20 10 ________________________20____ _______________________100____ _________ Policy on Plagiarism/Cheating Please consult http://library.sjsu.edu/leap/plagiar.htm. Policy may also be found in the SJSU Schedule of Classes. Library Resources Please check http://library.sjsu.edu. Accommodations of Students with Special Needs Students are referred to the Disability Resource Center, Administration Building 110, (408) 924-6000 (voice), (408) 924-5990 (TDD). You may access their policies and services via the internet at http://www.drc.sjsu.edu/policies/default.htm. 9 EDTE 162. Meeting the needs of second-language learners Second Language History Write a one or two-page description of you and your family (grandparents, parents, ,spouse, children) in terms of the first, second and/or third languages studied, acquired, and/or spoken by you and members of your family. What was the context in which those second languages were developed, used, or lost? The emphasis of this paper should be on how you have developed your second language skills. You may wish to indicate how those language skills have varied over your lifetime. How have you personally developed and maintained two languages? Describe your language skills and how you hope to maintain and/or develop them. Be sure to include how you plan to maintain and develop your English-language oracy and literacy skills. Due on February 17, 2004. Example: Alexander Sapiens I was born in Soledad, California. I was the eighth child of Alberto and Josefina Sapiens. Alberto was born in Sonora, Mexico in 1894 and only spoke Spanish in our home. Josefina was born in Kansas and spoke Spanish and English. Although we all spoke Spanish at home, my mother and all my siblings were Spanish-English bilinguals. Nonetheless, my brothers and sisters spoke more English than Spanish. When I went to kindergarten at Soledad Elementary School, I was punished for speaking Spanish at school. After that linguistic culture clash, I would only speak English at school and in the community. In fact, I began to speak only English to my parents and siblings. My father would only speak to me in Spanish. As a consequence, I grew up understanding, but not speaking Spanish. I became a receptive bilingual. English became my dominant language and Spanish was relegated to a mental closet. In high school, I studied one year of French. Spanish was not offered. This year, I am studying French in preparation of a trip to France this summer. When I went to college, I encountered a problem that only I could resolve. My father was literate in Spanish, but not in English. In order to communicate with him while I was away from home I had to write in Spanish! , I began to study Spanish at the university. I became impatient with traditional Spanish language instruction at Oregon State University. I studied Spanish at La Universidad Ibero-Americana in Mexico City during the summer following my junior year. Although I had learned sufficient Spanish to communicate orally in Spanish for sustained periods of time, I was not satisfied. Three years of university coursework in Spanish was the extent of my formal study in Spanish. Following my graduation from college, I accepted a teaching position in Colombia, South America. After two years, I returned to the United States bilingual and biliterate in Spanish and English. After spending two years with the U. S. Army, I returned to California to become a bilingual teacher. I have been a bilingual educator since 1972! I continue to use both languages, socially and professionally. I make an effort to watch Spanishlanguage television, to listen to Spanish-language radio, and to read books and newspapers in Spanish. I occasionally write poetry in Spanish. Most of my oral and written correspondence and communication is in English, my dominant language. I have found that my spelling in English was improved because of my knowledge of Spanish. I try to read at least two novels and one nonfiction book per month in English. I subscribe to and read approximately ten educational and popular magazines as well. I also write a lot of letters and emails in English. In effect, I have become a life-long learner of English and Spanish. Spring 2004 EDTE 162 Meeting the needs of L2 learners Annotated Article Review Spring 2004 The review of two articles must be from refereed educational journals. These articles must deal with bilingual education from educational journals dated from 1994 to present. The reviews may not exceed one page in length and must include a citation, description, and personal position or comment. The two articles must be connected thematically. Please sign up for your articles. No student may review an article already selected and reviewed by another student. Article reviews are due on March 23. Do not procrastinate! Citation (20%): Author by Last Name, First Name, Initial. (year). Title of article. Title of journal; Volume Number, (Issue Number), Page Numbers. Description (20%): One-paragraph description of the key points of the article. This description should include the main idea or position presented as well as supporting arguments. If it is a research study, the description should include the hypothesis, details about the study, and the conclusions. It would help to enumerate the principal strategies, issues, and or conclusions. Critique (20%): One-paragraph critique of the article detailing the strengths or weaknesses of the article. Take a position with regard to whether you (a) agree or disagree with the author; (b) think that the article is a major contribution or a waste of time; (c) like or dislike the article; or (d) the article has a bias or a flaw. Support your position with evidence that substantiates your view or position. In other words, tell me what you think about the article and why. Common Theme (20%) Both articles are written about the same topic and similar student population. Grammar and Spelling (20%) Example Citation: Snow, C. E. (1992). Perspectives on second-language development: Implications for bilingual education. Educational Researcher, 21, 16-19. Description: Snow provides a guide to basic research in second-language acquisition by characterizing distinct perspectives from foreign language teaching, first-language acquisition, psycholinguistics, and sociocultural factors. The research in these areas provides some answers to common questions about second-language acquisition, including those of optimum age, factors that facilitate learning, the consequences of bilingualism, individual differences, and assessment techniques. Critique: This article is a valuable contribution to second language learning in the context of bilingual education. Snow reviews four approaches to studying second-language acquisition. She argues that a sociocultural perspective must be incorporated if we are to have adequate assessments of bilinguals or appropriate assessments of bilingual education programs. She succinctly responds to eight key questions. Thumbs up! 11 EDTE 162. Meeting the needs of second-language learners Classroom Presentation Evaluation Students ___FB, HC, &_MC___________________ Book: __Between Worlds by Freeman & Freeman____ Date _________________ Chapter _____7________ Did you tell the class what the lesson was about? HC introduced the team members and gave a brief overview of the lesson. Introduction HC Activity FB Conclusion - MC What key concepts of the lesson were highlighted? 1 Explorer teacher techniques 2 Encouraging collaboration 3 Employing different modes 4 Focusing on the learner What activities were presented to involve the students? Did the activities reinforce the concepts presented in the lesson? Activity was a "Peaks and Valleys" representation of family history. FB formed the groups while HC and MC had members of the groups draw cards which determined their job assignment within the group. This classroom management transition went off very smoothly. FB explained the use of the line graph (individual family history of peaks and valleys), the use of the bar graph (compilation of events within each group) and the use of the peaks and valleys activity task card. The students had to plot 2 major peaks and 2 major valleys. This limitation of events want not noted until students began plotting more than 2 peaks and valleys. Students had to chart all the major events (peaks and valleys) on a bar graph. Some people's peaks were other people's valleys. No distinction was made between positive and negative events. Team members circulated about the class and kept the groups on task. Was there a summary or conclusion of key concepts? Did you tell them what you taught? MC gave the summary reviewing Applying Explorer Techniques Cooperative Learning Focus on Learner Were handouts or audiovisual materials provided or used? Describe. Students were provided with a handout with the key concepts The overheads were in color and were very legible (large print). These overheads were very professional in presentation. By the far the best overheads presented yet! Comments: This lesson was well organized, highly interactive, and interesting because it tapped the background and interests of the students. The team members supported each other throughout each activity and kept the lesson moving without any long pauses that could have lost the students. The overheads were very legible. The handout to the student really helped them because of the large number of concepts presented. HC did a very good job of presenting the key concepts. Grade: 12 Unit Plan The Unit Plan should have an overall theme and grade level. This unit plan should have 10 lessons and span a two-week period. Within each lesson, there should be a lesson plan that includes (1) a title or topic; (2) 1-2 objectives that are measurable and observable; (3) 2-3 enabling activities that will enable the student to meet the objective; and (4) an assessment or feedback to check for learning. Consider using a thematic map to help you develop an integrated theme across different disciplines. Do not forget into incorporate a multicultural strand Incorporate differentiated instruction by indicating which enabling activities are appropriate for your fictitious classroom. That class has 5 beginning English learners(BE), 5 intermediate English learners (IE), and 10+ Advanced English learners and/or English-only students (EO). Use acronym SWBAT (Students will be able to). Here is an example: Theme: The lowly clam : Environmental barometer. Clams are bottom-feeding celephopods that live in fresh or salt water. They filter water through their bodies in order to obtain water and nutrients. Grade Level: 4th grade. Overview: The students will learn about the role of clams and how they have may serve as an environmental barometer. They will learn how clams are used, particularly as a source of food Lesson 1: Clams as organism. Objective:1) SWBAT identify major parts of a clam. 2) SWBAT describe where and how a clam lives. Enabling Activities: 1) Students will view live and model clams in groups of 4. (BE, IE, EO) 2) Students will view a film on the life of a clam. (BE, IE, EO) 3) Students will read a short passage on clams from Thousand Camps. (IE, EO) 4) Students will label a diagram of the clam's major body parts. (BE, IE, EO) Assessment: 1) Students will complete a worksheet labeling the parts of clams. Lesson 2: Clams as food. Objective:1) SWBAT describe dishes that have clams: cioppino, clam chowder. 2) SWBAT write a recipe with clams. Enabling Activities: 1) Students will read recipes of dishes that contain clams. (BE, IE, EO) 2) Students will taste clams in clam chowder. (BE, IE, EO) 3) Students will find and write a recipe for clams from a selected culture. (BE, IE, EO) 4) Students will explain which parts of the clam are eaten. (BE, IE) Assessment: 1) Students will complete a taste survey on clam chowder. 2) Students will turn in a clam recipe. Lesson 3: Clams at sea. Objective:1) SWBAT identify more than one species of clams. 2) SWBAT color or make the range of a clam species on a map. Enabling Activities: 1) Students will view a film on clams and their distribution. (BE, IE, EO) 2) Students will map out the distribution of one variety of clam. (BE, IE) 3) Students will read short articles about clams and their natural history. (IE, EO) 4) Students will draw and color a map of a clam's range. (BE, IE, EO) Assessment: Students will turn in a map depicting the range of a species of clam. Lesson 4: Clams in the marine food chain. Objective:1) SWBAT describe the marine food chain in relation to clams. 2) SWBAT analyze the value of clams as food. Enabling Activities: 1) Students will read about predators of clams. 2) Students will read short passages about otters and other predators 3) Students will read about clam farms. Assessment: Students will write a descriptive paragraph and graph the clam in the marine food chain. (BE, IE, EO) (BE, IE, EO) (BE, IE, EO) 13 Lesson 5: Clams and their distribution. Objective:1) SWBAT look up cultures that utilize clams. 2) SWBAT locate a species of clam on a map. Enabling Activities: 1) Students will examine the distribution of clams and cultures that use clams. 2) Students will make 2-minute oral reports on clam cultures (geographic and or historical). 3) Students will list the different ways that clams are used by cultures. Assessment: Students will graph the uses of clams by culture. Lesson 6: Uses of clam shells: Past and present Objective:1) SWBAT describe the use of clam shells by different cultures. 2) SWBAT list at least five things that can be done with clam shells. Enabling Activities: 1) Students will read passages from Thousand Camps. 2) Students will read how clams are used in industry/different cultures. 3) Students will analyze the composition of clam shells. Assessment: Students will list at least five uses of clam shells. (BE, IE, EO) (IE, EO) (BE, IE, EO) (BE, IE, EO) (BE, IE, EO) (BE, IE, EO) Lesson 7: Clams as environmental filters Objective:1) SWBAT explain how clams act as environmental filters. 2) SWBAT identify which part of the clam acts as a filter. Enabling Activities: 1) Students will view a film on how scientists use clams to determine levels of environmental contamination. (BE, IE, EO) 2) Students will read short passages about substances that clams capture or retain. (BE, IE, EO) 3) Students will explain how clams are like a miner's canary. (BE, IE, EO) Assessment: Students will list three substances that clams cannot filter. Lesson 8: Clam Digs Objective:1) SWBAT read stories about how people find clams 2) SWBAT describe a clam dig. Enabling Activities: 1) Students will view a film of a clam dig. 2) Students will write a poem about a clam or clam dig. 3) Students will sing a "clam song" or clam up. Assessment: Students will create an original clam song or poem. (BE, IE, EO) (BE, IE, EO) (BE, IE, EO) Lesson 9: Clammy hands mystery or the half-baked clam bake. Objective:1) SWBAT write a short skit or mystery about clams. 2) SWBAT read about the invasion of foreign clams. Enabling Activities: 1) Students will write a 10-line skit about a clam mystery. (BE, IE, EO) 1) Students will act out a short skit about a clam mystery. (BE, IE, EO) 2) Students will read selected passages from Thousand Camps. (BE, IE, EO) Assessment: Students will present a short mystery or story about a clam. Lesson 10: Summary of Clam Culture Objective:1) SWBAT write a short report on uses of clams Enabling Activities: 1) Students will discuss the many ways clams are used. 2) Students will write a short story, poem, or report on clams Assessment: Students will turn in a written paper on clams. (BE, IE, EO) (BE, IE, EO) ...
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course EDTE 162 at San Jose State University .

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