AnUnfinishedCanvas.SummaryReport

AnUnfinishedCanvas.SummaryReport - SUMMARY REPORT Research...

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Unformatted text preview: SUMMARY REPORT Research conducted by SRI International An Unfinished Canvas Arts Education in California: Taking Stock of Policies and Practices SRI International 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, CA 94025 Phone: 650.859.2000 This study was commissioned by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation; the Ford Foundation provided additional support. This Summary Report was written to provide an overview of study findings. A more expansive full report, with additional details and more technical information, is available. Copies of both reports can be downloaded from http://www.sri.com/policy/cep/edreform/ArtsEd.html. Suggested citation: Woodworth, K. R., Gallagher, H. A., & Guha, R. An unfinished canvas. Arts education in California: Taking stock of policies and practices. Summary Report. Menlo Park, CA: SRI International. Silicon Valley-based SRI International is one of the worlds leading independent research and technology development organizations. Founded as Stanford Research Institute in 1946, SRI has been meeting the strategic needs of clients for more than 60 years. SRIs Center for Education Policy studies reforms that hold promise for improving the K-16 system of schooling and lifelong learning. The Center conducts research and evaluations on the design, implementation, and impact of educational programs, especially improvement efforts. For more information about SRI, please visit our Web site: www.sri.com . Copyright 2007 SRI International. All rights reserved. Could it be possible that California, of all places, is ambivalent about the role of arts in education? On one hand, the states policy-makers ratified the importance of arts education in 2001, when California enacted rigorous standards that outline what every student should know in four areasvisual arts, music, dance and theaterand at every grade level. And on the other hand are the findings of An Unfinished Canvas. The report, the first comprehensive examination of whether California has acted upon its recognition of the importance of arts education, recounts the myriad ways in which the state has fallen short, not just of its own acknowledged goals, but in comparison to the rest of the nation. While An Unfinished Canvas examines what California does and, more often, does not doto educate the next generation in the arts, its also worth revisiting why the arts are so important in our schools. A 2002 survey of more than 60 research projects about the impact of arts education on student learning found numerous ways in which studying of the arts nurtures other learning, from musics role in cognitive development and spatial reasoning to the ways that drama fosters reading comprehension....
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AnUnfinishedCanvas.SummaryReport - SUMMARY REPORT Research...

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