American history - "American history" redirects here. For...

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"American history" redirects here. For the history of the continents, see History of the Americas . See also: Outline of United States history History of the United States This article is part of a series Timeline Pre-Columbian period Colonial period 1776–1789 1789–1849 1849–1865 1865–1918 1918–1945 1945–1964 1964–1980 1980–1991 1991–present Topic Westward expansion Overseas expansion Diplomatic history Military history Technological and industrial history Economic history Cultural history Civil War History of the South Civil Rights (1896–1954) Civil Rights (1955–1968) Women's history United States Portal v d e The first residents of what is now the United States immigrated from Asia prior to 15,000 years ago by crossing Beringia into Alaska . Archaeological evidence of these peoples, the ancestors of the Native Americans is dated to 14,000 years ago. [1] Christopher Columbus was the first European to land in the territory of what is now the United States when he arrived in Puerto Rico in 1493. The subsequent arrival of settlers from Europe began the colonial history of the United States . The Thirteen British colonies that would become
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the original US states , were founded along the east coast beginning in 1607. Spain , France and Russia also founded small settlements in what would become US territory. The Thirteen Colonies grew very rapidly, reaching 50,000 by 1650, 250,000 by 1700, and 2.5 million by 1775. High birth rates and low death rates were augmented by steady flows of immigrants from Europe as well as slaves from the West Indies. Occasional small-scale wars involved the French and Indians to the north, and the Spanish and Indians to the south. Religion was a powerful influence on many immigrants, especially the Puritans in New England and the German sects in Pennsylvania, with boosts from the revivals of the First Great Awakening . The colonies by the 1750s had achieved a standard of living about as high as Britain, with far more self government than anywhere else. Most free men owned their own farms and could vote in elections for the colonial legislatures, while local courts dispensed justice. Royal soldiers were rarely seen. [2] The colonists did not have representation in the ruling British government and believed they were being denied their constitutional rights as Englishmen . For many years, the home government had permitted wide latitude to local colonial governments. Beginning in the 1760s London demanded the colonists pay taxes. The new foreign taxes on stamps and tea ignited a firestorm of opposition. The British responded with military force in Massachusetts, and shut down the system of local self government in what the colonists called the Intolerable Acts . After fighting broke out in April 1775, each of the colonies ousted all royal officials and set up
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American history - "American history" redirects here. For...

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