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CE154 - Lecture 8-9 Culvert Design

CE154 - Lecture 8-9 Culvert Design - Design of Culverts...

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CE154 Design of Culverts CE154 Hydraulic Design Lectures 8-9 Fall 2009 1
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CE154 Culverts Definition - A structure used to convey surface runoff through embankments. It may be a round pipe, rectangular box, arch, ellipse, bottomless, or other shapes. And it may be made of concrete, steel, corrugated metal, polyethylene, fiberglass, or other materials. Fall 2009 2
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Fall 2009 CE154 3 Culverts End treatment includes projected, flared, & head and wing walls
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CE154 Fall 2009 4
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CE154 Concrete Box Culvert Fall 2009 5
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CE154 Box culvert with fish passage Fall 2009 6
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CE154 Corrugated metal horseshoe culvert Fall 2009 7
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CE154 Bottomless culvert USF&W Fall 2009 8
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CE154 Some culvert, huh? Fall 2009 9
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CE154 Culvert or Bridge? Fall 2009 10
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CE154 Study materials Design of Small Dams (DSD) pp. 421– 429 (culvert spillway), 582-589 (hydraulic calculation charts) US Army Drainage Manual (ADM),TM 5- 820-4/AFM 88-5, Chapter 4, Appendix B - Hydraulic Design Data for Culverts Fall 2009 11
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CE154 Study Objectives Recognize different culvert flow conditions Learn the steps to analyze culvert hydraulics Learn to design culverts Fall 2009 12
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Fall 2009 CE154 13 Definition Sketch
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CE154 Definition Sketch Fall 2009 14
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CE154 Relevant technical terms Critical depth The depth at which the specific energy (y+v 2 /2g) of a given flow rate is at a minimum Soffit or crown The inside top of the culvert Invert & thalweg Channel bottom & lowest point of the channel bottom Headwater The water body at the inlet of a culvert Fall 2009 15
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CE154 Relevant technical terms Tailwater The water body at the outlet of a culvert Submerged outlet An outlet is submerged when the tailwater level is higher than the culvert soffit. Fall 2009 16
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CE154 Relevant technical terms Inlet control Occurs when the culvert barrel can convey more flow than the inlet will accept. The flow is only affected by headwater level, inlet area, inlet edge configuration, and inlet shape. Factors such as roughness of the culvert barrel, length of the culvert, slope and tailwater level have no effect on the flow when a culvert is under inlet control. Fall 2009 17
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CE154 Relevant technical terms Outlet control Occurs when the culvert barrel can not convey more flow than the inlet can accept. The flow is a function of the headwater elevation, inlet area, inlet edge configuration, inlet shape, barrel roughness, barrel shape and area, slope, and tailwater level. Fall 2009 18
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CE154 Relevant technical terms Normal depth Occurs in a channel reach when the flow, velocity and depth stay constant. Under normal flow condition, the channel slope, water surface slope and energy slope are parallel. Steep slope Occurs when the normal depth is less than the critical depth. The flow is called supercritical flow. Fall 2009 19
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CE154 Relevant technical terms Mild slope Occurs when the normal depth is higher than the critical depth. The flow is called subcritical flow.
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