Astr102.12Sp10GSheet

Astr102.12Sp10GSheet - San José State University...

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Unformatted text preview: San José State University Department of Physics and Astronomy ASTR102: “Astronomy Lab” Section 12, Spring 2010 Instructor: Maxine Shao Office Location: Science 324 Telephone: (408) 924-5724 Email: [email protected] su.edu Class DayslTime: Thursday 9:00am-l 1 :50am Classroom: Science 319 GE/SJSU Studies Category: B3 MYSJSU Messaging Be sure that you have an email address registered through the MySJSU messaging site so that I can reach you if there are any important class announcements. Course Description Astronomy 102 is a one—unit upper division physical science laboratory experience designed for General Education, covering basic astronomical observing techniques and basic scientific methodology as applied to astronomy. A specific schedule of lab exercises for this semester is on the final page of this green sheet. Course Goals and Student Learning Objectives A few specific examples of how the Learning Objectives for this course will be met are: ' Students wili learn to use the methods of science and knowledge derived from current scientific inquiry in physical science to question existing explanations by: 1. Creating impact craters with flour, inspecting the detailed morphology of the resulting craters and comparing the results to photographic evidence from planets in our Solar System to critically examine the hypothesis that planetary craters have an impact origin (Lab #10). Using a celestial globe to investigate UFO reports from. around the world. The investigation reveals that most sightings are bright stars or planets, demonstrating that there are explanations besides the asserted UFO claim and that just because an explanation is “common” doesn‘t mean it shouldn‘t be questioned (Lab #4). - Students will use the methods of science, in which quantitative, analytical reasoning techniques are used by: l. Astronomy Lab, ASTR102, Spring 2010 Using spectroscopes to individually record the emission patterns from various gases, comparing measurements with a partner and then applying the data to the identification of unknown spectra. This requires observational gathering and analysis of quantitative data and logically applying the results to new circumstances (Lab #12). Using satellite photographic images to determine the rotation period of the Sun. By “filtering” the data with a histogram and averaging the individual measures, accuracies of a few tenths of a day are possible demonstrating the importance of repeated measurement and statistical analysis in scientific investigations (Lab #8). Page 1 of 4 ° Students will demonstrate ways in which science influences and is influenced by complex societies, including political and moral issues by: l. Considering the motivations for going to the Moon and the cost/benefit issues for manned space exploration during a lab that involves analysis of photographic data from the Apollo Moon missions (Lab #11). 2. Many of the activities (e.g., Labs#2-4, 8-14) involve analysis of the accuracy and errors in the results of the exercise. Students explain how a scientist should respond to critics who emphasize the “uncertainties” inherent in experimental/observational science in order to discredit the results, i.e., global warming, evolution, etc. 3. Building an astrowheei that shows the appearance of the sky at various dates and times and discussing how various cultural groups view the sky and how societal needs (Le. farming) played and important role in funding astronomical observations in ancient cultures (Lab #6). Prerequisite, or co-requisite An astronomy lecture course Required TextsIReadings Lab Manual Adventures in Astronomy, by Dr. L. J . Tomley (to be provided during the first lab meeting). Classroom Protocol Each lab introduction will begin promptly at 9:00 am, and you are expected to be on time. Lab reports are to be handed at, or before the end of the laboratory period. Since you cannot take you reports home you must plan your time carefully so that you can finish your lab report before the end of the lab period. You will have an easier time understanding the introduction, and you will finish the lab more quickly, if you read the exercise in the manual before each week's meeting. There are no make-up labs, so regular attendance is necessary in order to pass the lab. Contact me, via email, innncdiately if you know that you are going to miss a lab, I might be able to arrange for you to attend another person’s lab section to make up your missed exercise. Assignments and Grading Policy Course grades are based on the point totals accumuiatcd from various assignments. Final course grades have the minimum point total requirements listed in the next section. Each of your individual lab reports will be graded out of 10 points. Your lab reports need to conform to the following guidelines; 3) Write your answers to the questions at the end of each lab on a separate piece of notebook paper. b) Show how the results were obtained. Include preliminary measurements and samples of your calculations, not just the final results. c) In this upper division GE class writing is key component of your lab work. Points will be deducted for incomplete sentences, and inadequate reasoning. d) Present your report in an organized, neat format. You will lose points if I cannot read your writing easily, or if you do not erase, or white out your mistakes. e) Labs will be collected promptly at the end of each lab period. If you are not finished at 11:50am you will have to turn in what you have completed. Astronomy Lab, ASTR102, Spring 2010 Page 2 of 4 These letter grades are assigned based on the point total of the li labs that will be offered this semester. We have a quiz, and a short lab on our fifth meeting which together count as 10 points. The lowest of your 11 scores will be dropped. A+ 97-100 C+ 77-79 A 93-96 C 73-76 A- 90-92 C- 70-72 B+ 87-89 D+ 67-69 B 83-86 D 63-66 B— 80-82 D- 60-62 F < 60 Dropping and Adding Friday, February 5th is the last day to drop without penalty. Students are responsible for understanding the policies and procedures about addldrops, academic renewal, etc. Information on add/drops and many other policies and procedures are available at hng/info.sisu.edu/static/soc—fall/soc-fall.html . Students should be aware of the current deadlines and penalties for adding and dropping classes. The late- drop policy is here: ht_tpleww.sisu.edu/aars/policies/new policies! . University Policies Academic integrity Students should know that the University’s Academic Integrity Policy is available at h ' [www.sa 5' .ed own] ' dicial afl' ' s/Academic lnte ‘ Polic SOT-2. f. Your own commitment to learning, as evidenced by your enrollment at San Jose State University and the University’s integrity policy, require you to be honest in all your academic course work. Faculty members are required to report all infractions to the office of Student Conduct and Ethical Development. The website for Student Conduct and Ethical Development is available at h :l/www a 5'5 .ed ’u ' ial affair indexhtrnl. Instances of academic dishonesty will not be tolerated. Cheating on the quiz, or plagiarism (presenting the work of another as your own, or the use of another person’s ideas without giving proper credit) will result in a failing grade and sanctions by the University. For this class, all assignments are to be completed by the individual student unless otherwise specified. if you would like to include in your assignment any material you have submitted, or plan to submit for another class, please note that SJ SU’s Academic Policy F06-l requires approval of instructors. If you have any questions about proper citation procedures, or what is expected in a particular assignment, please let me know. Campus Policy In Compliance with the American Disabilities Act If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, or if you need to make special arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible, or see me during office hours. Presidential Directive 97-03 requires that students with disabilities requesting accommodations must register with the DRC (Disability Resource Center) to establish a record of their disability. Emergency Response In the unlikely event of a tsunami, nuclear attack, revolution, etc., or the more likely event of a fire or an earthquake, that requires that you leave the building, the likely warning of such an occasion will be the sounding of the fire/emergency alarm in the hallway. The “escape route” for such events is posted outside the door to this classroom. For us here in SCI 3i 9, the indicated route is doWn the stairs at the end of the hall just outside our room. Astronomy Lab, ASTRi 02, Spring 2010 Page 3 of 4 ASTR 102 Section 11/ Astronomy Lab, Fall 2009 Course Schedule Please note that we will not have class every week, due to the Universigz faculty filrlough schedule, and S : rin v Break. “Lab #” re ers to the laborato manual ’5 numberin . 1 2 2/4/10 Lab #2: Horizon System Special equipment 3 2/11/10 Lab #3: Equatorial System Special equipment 4 2/18/10 Lab #4: UFO Clearing House Special equipment 5 2/25/10 Quiz & Lab #7: Telescopes Special equipment 3/4/10 Lab #6: The Astrowheel Special equipment 7 3/11/10 3/ 18/ 10 Lab #10: Modeling Impact Craters Dress appropriately for this messy lab I 3/25/10 Lab #11: Lunar Surface Dating Special equipment 11 4/8/10 Lab #12: Spectroscopy An online version is available 4/ 15/ 10 Lab #13: Kepler’s 3r"t Law and the Mass of Jupiter Special equipment 4/22/10 Lab #14: The Hubble Law Lab #8: Solar Rotation Period Special equipment Astronomy Lab, ASTR102, Fall 2009 Page 4 of4 ...
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Astr102.12Sp10GSheet - San José State University...

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