{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lab_x4_Correlation_and_Multiple_Regression_Spring_2008

Lab_x4_Correlation_and_Multiple_Regression_Spring_2008 - 1...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
San Jose State University School of Social Work ScWk 242 Spring 2008 Lab Exercise #4: Correlation and Multiple Linear Regression Research Scenario 1a: Correlation You are a program manager in a large public child welfare agency located in an urban county. The programs you manage employ a total of 40 social workers who provide a variety of case management services to children and families involved in the child welfare system. As a program manager you are particularly interested in reducing employee turnover by preventing employee stress and burnout. You suspect that number of clients on caseload is related to employee stress levels. You ask your employees (N=40), to complete an employee stress survey that measures employee stress levels on a continuous scale with 0 = No stress, and 30 = High stress. The survey also asks employees to indicate the types of stress-reducing activities they regularly engage in, including such things as exercise. In addition the survey also contains demographic questions including race/ethnicity, age and gender. 1
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Step 1: Creating the Variables 1) Directions for creating the number of clients on caseload variable: In the “Name” field, type in the variable name: clients.caseload Use the tab button or the mouse to move the cursor to the “Label” field. In the “Label” field, type: Number of clients on caseload Leave the measurement level in the “Measures” field as scale. 2) Directions for creating the employee stress level variable In the “Name” field, type in the variable name: stress.level Use the tab button or the mouse to move the cursor to the “Label” field. In the “Label” field, type: Employee stress level Leave the measurement level in the “Measures” field as scale. 2 You will need a participant ID and 2 variables for this exercise: 1) Number of clients on caseload 2) Employee stress level
Image of page 2
Step 2: Entering the Data Click on “Data View” and enter the following data Participant ID Number of clients on caseload Employee stress level 1 50 19 2 54 24 3 60 26 4 45 15 5 42 19 6 61 25 7 65 24 8 63 27 9 43 17 10 52 20 11 51 16 12 49 14 13 67 26 14 39 16 15 42 15 16 64 24 17 54 20 18 51 19 19 60 27 20 46 15 21 42 18 22 49 17 23 66 25 24 53 21 25 65 27 26 54 20 27 58 22 28 48 17 29 54 19 30 68 24 31 67 27 32 41 21 33 59 22 34 65 24 35 41 19 36 50 17 37 60 20 38 65 23 3
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
39 51 21 40 50 20 Step 3: Running the Correlation and Scatter plots TO GENERATE THE CORRELATION From the top drop down menu, choose, “Analyze” Choose “Correlate” Choose “Bivariate” In the “Bivariate Correlations” dialog box, place the “number of clients on caseload” variable into the variables box Place the “”employee stress level” variable into the variables box Click OK and your correlation output will appear TO GENERATE THE SCATTER PLOT From the top drop down menu, choose “Graphs”
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern