Ch.6PublicReaction

Ch.6PublicReaction - Why do claims-makers typically use...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ch. 6 Public Reaction Why is it difficult to interpret the role of the general public in the social problems process? What is a representative sample and why are they difficult? How do subtle differences in the way questions are worded affect respondent’s answers? What are some consequences of answering a survey in a social situation? What does the following statement mean: “the media are probably more effective at agenda setting than at communicating particular messages” What are consequences when the media report on crime?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Why do claims-makers typically use public opinion polls? How do politicians view public opinion poll results? Why is studying folklore useful to those interested in social problems? When folklorists talk about a friend-of-a-friend (FOAF) attribution, what are they referring to? How are variants on stories useful? How do rumors differ from legends? Why does Joel Best suggests that people make jokes about troubling situations such as disasters?...
View Full Document

Page1 / 2

Ch.6PublicReaction - Why do claims-makers typically use...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online