Training manual

Training manual - Training Manual Resource Guide for COMM...

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for COMM 115P/241R Fall, 2010 Professor Shawn Spano
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Contents Overview 3 Introduction to Dialogue 4 A View from Communication Theory 4 Distinguishing Dialogue from Argument 7 Martin Buber’s Philosophy of Dialogue 8 Dialogue Characteristics 9 Dialogue, Differences, and Difficult Issues 10 Designing Dialogue Processes and Events 11 Two Levels of Dialogue Design 11 Design Principles and Guidelines 14 Facilitating Dialogue 16 What is Facilitation? 16 Principles of facilitation 17 Basic facilitation Tasks 17 Time Management 18 Neutrality 18 Curiosity and Wonder 18 Acknowledging 18 Summarizing 19 Restating 19 Reflecting Feelings 20 Reframing 20 Appreciative Questioning 21 Systemic Questioning 21 Managing Difficult Behavior 21 Flip Charts 22 Cultural Issues 23 Concluding Thoughts 24 References 25 2
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Overview This training manual and resource guide is divided into three sections. The first section provides an overview of dialogue as a unique and potentially valuable form of human communication. It highlights an approach to dialogue that is grounded in communication theory and linked to “real world” practical situations, especially those involving differences and difficult issues. The second section covers design considerations. It describes in very practical terms how Comm 210R seminar participants can go about developing and planning dialogue processes and events on campus and in the community. The section includes general guidelines for design as well as several formats that can be used. The third section focuses on the principles and micro-skills of dialogue facilitation. It includes practical techniques and skills for leading dialogue sessions with particular emphasis on the role of facilitators in this process. Acknowledgments: I wish to thank Stephen Littlejohn (with Leslie Farge, 2006) and Kim Pearce (2002), both from the Public Dialogue Consortium, for their permission in using excerpts from their training manuals in this resource guide. 3
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Introduction to Dialogue A View from Communication Theory There are many different approaches to dialogue. The one taken in this seminar begins with the assumption that dialogue is a unique form of human communication. The theory that guides this approach is social construction, or what is sometimes called the “communication perspective.” Social construction is based on a simple yet profound idea: Communication is the process through which we collectively create our social worlds. Rather than see communication as a neutral vehicle for transmitting information from one person to another, social construction treats communication as a primary activity, one that not only reflects meaning but shapes it as well. From this perspective, all the things that comprise our social worlds—emotions, personalities, relationships, beliefs, attitudes, identities, schools, governments, etc.—are made in patterns of communication. Communication does more than represent social reality, it actually creates it!
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course COMM 115P at San Jose State.

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Training manual - Training Manual Resource Guide for COMM...

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