ozSampling1 - Sampling Sampling To do most research one...

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Sampling
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    Sampling To do most research, one must have people to study. Sampling refers to selecting cases, or plain and simple, getting a group of  people (or other elements) out of the population to study. Whenever we attempt to make statements about a set of people in general  using a smaller group of people—generalizing—the data we use is from  a sample. Sample vs. Census Census:  “A complete count of an entire population” So why don’t we always do a census?
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    Sample vs. Population Population Sample
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    Sampling Types of Samples (You can sample almost anything): Case Studies   Persons in Field Studies Contexts Observed Archival Data   Experiment Participants  Persons answering a Survey  Depending on how the sample was generated, there are limits on how much  we may generalize. Given limits on generalizability, the purpose of your research will help  determine the type of sampling you do.
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    Sampling Sampling Techniques Nonprobability:  Sampling methods that do not let us know in  advance the likelihood of selecting for the sample each  element or case from a population vs.  Probability:  Sampling methods that allow us to know in  advance how likely it is that any element of a population will  be selected for the sample  Knowing the chance of selection allows one to control sampling  bias (under or overrepresentation of a population  characteristic in a sample)
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    Sampling Sampling Techniques Nonprobability (Very common in psychology, medicine, sociology) Availability Sampling, convenience sampling—selection of  cases based on what is easiest to get Experiments Exploratory and Qualitative research Avoid this if you can Quota Sampling—Knowing something about your target  population, you select your availability sample to ensure that  it looks similar to your population
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    Sampling Sampling Techniques Nonprobability Snowball Sampling—Respondent-driven sampling where 
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course SOCI 104 at San Jose State.

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ozSampling1 - Sampling Sampling To do most research one...

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