coping with the free market city

coping with the free market city - COPING WITH THE FREE...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Latin American Research Review, Vol. 41, No. 2, June 2006 © 2006 by the University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, TX 78713-7819 COPING WITH THE FREE MARKET CITY Collective Action in Six Latin American Cities at the End of the Twentieth Century 1 Bryan R. Roberts, University of Texas, Austin Alejandro Portes, Princeton University Received: 9-23-2004; Revise and resubmit 12-9-2004; Revised received 5-19-2005; Final acceptance 8-24-2005 Abstract: Major social and economic changes in Latin America brought about by adoption of the neoliberal model of development have been documented in the recent research literature. We ask to what extent such changes have affected the character of popular collective mobilizations in major cities of the region. We present data from six recent field studies in major Latin American cities that identify goals pursued by contemporary popular movements and organizations and the strategies they adopt to achieve them. These studies provide an overview of how urban society has reacted to the constraints, crises, and opportunities brought about by the new model of development and cast light on what has changed and what remains the same in determinants of popular collective demand-making in major metropolitan areas. Theoretical and practical implications of these re- sults are discussed. INTRODUCTION In this paper we use case studies of urban collective action in six major metropolitan areas of Latin America, five of which are capital cities, to explore continuities and changes in the nature of neighborhood-based popular mobilizations. These are Buenos Aires, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, and Santiago. In the 1970s and 1980s, their populations were active in protesting the inequities and scarcities that accompanied their rapid growth even in face of the lack of democratic opportunities for effective voice (for Rio de Janeiro, see Machado da 1. The data on which this paper is based were collected as part of the Princeton-Texas Project on Latin American Urbanization in the Late Twentieth Century, conducted with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. We gratefully acknowledged the com- ments and suggestions of our collaborators in this project (listed subsequently), and of the editors and anonymous reviewers of this journal. Responsibility for the content is exclusively ours.
Background image of page 2
58 Latin American Research Review Silva 1969, Perlman 1976, and Leeds 1974; for Santiago: Portes 1972 and Castells 1983; for Mexico City: Cornelius 1983 and Eckstein 1977; for Lima: Blondet 1991, Collier 1976, Dietz 1977, and Degregori et al. 1986; for Montevideo: Filgueira 1986; for Buenos Aires: James 2003, Jelin 1985, Germani 1965, and González Bombal 1989). 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course ANTH 178 at San Jose State University .

Page1 / 28

coping with the free market city - COPING WITH THE FREE...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online