ScientificMethodPseudoscience

ScientificMethodPseudoscience - Scientific Methods...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Scientific Methods
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Scientific Method: What is it? A process of acquiring scientific knowledge. It is a logical, objective and orderly way to formulate and test theories.
Image of page 2
After an observation : you form a hypothesis (a testable statement) you design a study you choose subjects you carry out the study you analyze the study you make conclusions you re-test
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hypothesis Proposal intended to explain certain facts or observations Based on prior observations A statement (an educated guess) It must be reasonable It is not a question It must be testable!! -Specific -it implies a link between observations and outcome.
Image of page 4
Observation vs. Intervention Observational Studies Surveys Case reports Reports of treatments/outcome Reports of procedures/outcome Description of population (Diets/Disease relationships) Conclusions? Relationships only Associations Correlations No cause and effect relation
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Intervention studies Comparison of an outcome between 2 groups of people deliberately subjected to different dietary or drug regimens Compare treatment group with control group Placebo treatment is needed If intervention study If similar experimental and control group subjects If a temporal association is shown If random assignment to groups is done Then cause and effect relationships may be concluded.
Image of page 6
Retrospective vs. Prospective Used to find cause/effect Retro-spective = looking back People with disease – find clues for cause Habits Foods
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Pro-spective = look ahead Find experimental group – look at 1 characteristic Match subject’s characteristic Wait to see disease develop Compare subjects
Image of page 8
Cross-sectional vs. Longitudnal Cross-sectional Choose subjects and assess 1 time Pick variable to assess Value
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Longitudnal (Cohort Study) Choose subjects and assess same variable many times Slow, drop outs!
Image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern