Ovid Reading - B O O K S B Y A L L E N MA N D E L B A U M P...

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Unformatted text preview: B O O K S B Y A L L E N MA N D E L B A U M P O E T R Y Journeyman, 1967 Leaves of Absence, 1976 Chelmaxioms: The Maxims, Axioms, Maxioms of Chelm, 1978 A Lied of Letterpress, 1980 The Savantasse of Montparnasse, 1988 VERSE TRANSLATI ONS/ EDI TI ONS Life of a Man by Giuseppe Ungaretti, 1958 Selected Writings of Salvatore Quasimodo, 1 9 6 0 The Aeneid of Virgil, 1972 (National Book Award, 1973), 1981 Selected Poems of Giuseppe Ungaretti Inferno of Dante, 1980 Purgatorio of Dante, 1982 Paradiso of Dante, 1984 Ovid in Sicily, 1 9 8 6 Ungaretti and Palinurus , 1989 The Odyssey of Homer, 1990 The Metamorphoses of OVID A N E W V E R S E T R A N S L A T I O N B Y Allen Mandelbaum A Harvest Book Harcourt Brace & Company S A N D I E G O N E W Y O R K L O N D O N PYTHON APOLLO & DAPHNE APOLLO & DAPHNE And when, still muddy from the flood, the earth had dried beneath the sunlight's clement warmth, she brought forth countless living forms: while some were the old sorts that earth had now restored, she also fashioned shapes not seen before. And it was then that earth, against her will, had to engender you, enormous Python, a horrid serpent, new to all men's eyes a sight that terrified the reborn tribes: your body filled up all the mountainside. That snake was killed by Phoebus; until then he had not used his fatal bow except to hunt down deer and goats in flight: he smashed that monster with innumerable shafts, a task that left his quiver almost bare before the Python perished in the pool of poisoned blood that poured out of his wounds. To keep the memory of his great feat alive, the god established sacred games; and after the defeated serpent's name, they were called Pythian. Here all young men who proved to be the best at boxing or at running or at chariot racing wore a wreath of oak leaves as their crown of honor. The laurel tree did not exist as yet; to crown his temples, graced by fair long hair, Phoebus used wreaths of leaves from any tree. Now Daphnedaughter of the river- god, Peneuswas the first of Phoebus' loves. This love was not the fruit of random chance: what fostered it was Cupid's cruel wrath. For now, while Phoebus still was taking pride in his defeat of Python, he caught sight Latin [434-551 Latin [455-80) BO OK I 21 of Cupid as he bent his bow to tie the string at the two ends. He said: "Lewd boy, what are you doing with that heavy bow?...
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Ovid Reading - B O O K S B Y A L L E N MA N D E L B A U M P...

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