The Shit - Native American Genetics The search for...

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Native American Genetics The search for emigrational lineage By Eric Ron
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Native American Genetics Modern genetics is an expansive field of new science and technology, which has just scratched the surface of its potential. The newest uses for DNA are in the medical world, cancer treatment and prevention, non-stem celled cloning, and the prevention of genetic disease continually shapes our day-to-day lives. However genetics has an eclectic variety of applications. One particular branch of genetics that is particularly interesting is the study of heritage and lineage. By using genetic material scientists are able to track people and cultures back two hundred thousand years to a common ancestry. Throughout the research done, an interesting discovery disproved the existing hypothesis on the migration of Native American people into the new land. It was always speculated that, thirty five thousand years ago, prehistoric humans walked from the tip of Asia across a land bridge to Alaska, from where they spread through the unpopulated continents of North and South America. (Merriwether, Rothammer, Ferrell (1995)) The common belief, proposed by Joseph Greenberg, was based on the hypothesis that there were three distinct waves of migration from Asia to the Americas, at three different times. Another important distinction is that each wave contributed different groups of people with different languages. The first wave of
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migrants were the descendents of the Amerind speaking people, and were believed to have crossed eleven thousand years ago. (Mulligan, Hunley, Cole, Long (2004)) This was speculated to have been the largest crossing, being that the descendents of the Amerindians occupied all of South America, most of the continental United States, and the southern portion of Canada. The second migration was believed to have occurred nine
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course CHEM 132 taught by Professor Broderick during the Spring '08 term at MSU Bozeman.

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The Shit - Native American Genetics The search for...

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