Chap8-CriticalTheory

Chap8-CriticalTheory - Chapter 8 CriticalCriminology:...

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Chapter 8 Critical Criminology: It’s a Class Thing
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Critical Criminology Rejects the notion that law is  designed to maintain a tranquil  society, while criminals aim to  disrupt this peace. Crime is actually an expression of  rage by oppressed classes; the poor  and minorities. “True crimes” are the large scale  situations that impact millions.
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Origins of Critical Criminology Grew out of the political and social  turmoil of the 1960s, and strongly based  on the writings of Karl Marx. Primary issue is the division of Power in  society and the relationship to wealth,  both being concentrated in the hands of a  few key groups or individuals. Critical theorists see these groups  wielding their influence to promote their  position, while subjugating others. Criminals are forced to turn to crime to  survive and to express their anger at “the  system”.
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Chap8-CriticalTheory - Chapter 8 CriticalCriminology:...

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