The_Water_Cycle - The Water Cycle Transpiration What is...

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The Water Cycle: Transpiration What is transpiration? Transpiration is the process by which moisture is carried through plants from  roots to small pores on the underside of leaves, where it changes to vapor and is  released to the atmosphere. Transpiration is essentially evaporation of water  from plant leaves. Transpiration also includes a process called guttation, which is  the loss of water in liquid form from the uninjured leaf or stem of the plant,  principally through water stomata. Studies have revealed that about 10 percent of the moisture found in the  atmosphere is released by plants through transpiration. The remaining 90  percent is mainly supplied by  evaporation  from  oceans , seas, and other bodies of  water (lakes, rivers, streams). Transpiration and plant leaves Plants put down roots into the soil to draw water  and nutrients up into the stems and leaves. Some of this water is returned to the  air by transpiration (when combined with evaporation, the total process is known  as evapotranspiration). Transpiration rates vary widely depending on weather  conditions, such as temperature, humidity, sunlight availability and intensity,  precipitation, soil type and saturation, wind, land slope, and water use and  diversion by people. During dry periods, transpiration can contribute to the loss of  moisture in the upper soil zone, which can have an effect on vegetation and food- crop fields.
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How much water do plants transpire?
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