H_M_dies_at_82

H_M_dies_at_82 - H M an Unforgettable Amnesiac Dies at 82...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
H. M., an Unforgettable Amnesiac, Dies at 82  SIGN IN TO E-MAIL OR SAVE THIS PRINT SINGLE PAGE REPRINTS SHARE By BENEDICT CAREY Published: December 4, 2008 He knew his name. That much he could remember.    Multimedia Graphic  Inside the Brain   Related
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
H.M.’s Brain and the History of Memory  (npr.org) He knew that his father’s family came from Thibodaux, La., and his mother  was from Ireland, and he knew about the 1929 stock market crash and World  War II and life in the 1940s. But he could remember almost nothing after that. In 1953, he underwent an experimental brain operation in Hartford to correct  seizure disorder , only to emerge from it fundamentally and irreparably  changed. He developed a syndrome neurologists call profound  amnesia . He  had lost the ability to form new memories. For the next 55 years, each time he met a friend, each time he ate a meal, each  time he walked in the woods, it was as if for the first time. And for those five decades, he was recognized as the most important patient in  the history of brain science. As a participant in hundreds of studies, he helped  scientists understand the biology of learning,  memory  and physical dexterity,  as well as the fragile nature of human identity. On Tuesday evening at 5:05, Henry Gustav Molaison — known worldwide only  as H. M., to protect his privacy — died of  respiratory failure  at a nursing home  in Windsor Locks, Conn. His death was confirmed by Suzanne Corkin, a  neuroscientist at the  Massachusetts Institute of Technology , who had worked  closely with him for decades. Henry Molaison was 82.  From the age of 27, when he embarked on a life as an object of intensive study,  he lived with his parents, then with a relative and finally in an institution. His  amnesia did not damage his intellect or radically change his personality. But he  could not hold a job and lived, more so than any mystic, in the moment. “Say it however you want,” said Dr. Thomas Carew, a neuroscientist at the  University of California, Irvine, and president of the Society for Neuroscience.  “What H. M. lost, we now know, was a critical part of his identity.”  At a time when neuroscience is growing exponentially, when students and  money are pouring into laboratories around the world and researchers are 
Background image of page 2
mounting large-scale studies with powerful brain-imaging technology, it is easy  to forget how rudimentary neuroscience was in the middle of the 20th century.  When Mr. Molaison, at 9 years old, banged his head hard after being hit by a 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 7

H_M_dies_at_82 - H M an Unforgettable Amnesiac Dies at 82...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online