Tropical CaseStudy2 - state of war. Case study Chacon and...

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Tropical Adaptation Yanomamo Case study
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Social structure Exogamy Members of same localized lineage are forbidden to marry. Bilateral cross cousin marriage Marriage partners are doubly related from matrilineal and patrilineal lines Endogamy Village level; variable based on size and power of village Polygany Men can marry more than one wife as symbol of status; occurs 20% of time; results—some men do not marry or marry late in life.
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Patterns Localized patrilineal moiety Small groups seldom exceeding two adult generations, same village. Lineage members considered related as brother / sister The Village Nucleated settlement of paired patrilineages Marriage alliances Small group size or need for military allies may lead to exogamous arrangements
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Patterns Feasting alliances Peaceful relations maintained through elaborate feasts; these groups not enemies or marriage alliance partners Trading alliances Regular exchange of craft gifts among peaceful allies Enemies Groups not part of above alliances maintain constant
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Unformatted text preview: state of war. Case study Chacon and the Yanomamo Consider environment Consider social arrangements Consider foraging and hunting strategies Shifting horticulture Home range foraging strategies [functional analysiscost/benefit maximization] Variables Highland and Lowland Yanomamo Differences in land area cultivated Differences in fish, hunting Home range not a defended territory Political autonomy Each village autonomous Changes Missions have encouraged new settlement patterns Limited to no success at conversions Dependencies on axes, machetes, aluminum cooking pots, fish hooks; new exchange patterns and wage work Questions Which procurement strategies seem most suitable for sustaining the Yanomamo? Which changes are likely to stimulate the greatest social imbalances? Compare and contrast this case and the Ojibwa example. Suggest one possible intervention that might benefit the Yanomamo...
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course ANTH 143 at San Jose State University .

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Tropical CaseStudy2 - state of war. Case study Chacon and...

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