Chapter 13 Spinal Control of Movement

Chapter 13 Spinal Control of Movement - Chapter 13 Spinal...

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Chapter 13 Spinal Control of Movement Skip pages 433-437
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Each muscle fiber is innervated by a single axon
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The cell bodies of lower motor neurons are located in the ventral horn of the spinal cord • Axons of lower motor neurons form the ventral roots, and then • join sensory axons in mixed spinal nerves
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The ventral horn is enlarged in spinal cord segments that innervate the arms and the legs
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Distribution of lower motor neurons within the ventral horn • Motor neurons controlling axial muscles lie medial to those controlling distal muscles • Motor neurons controlling flexors lie dorsal to those controlling extensors
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Alpha motor neurons make the muscle contract • A motor unit is a single alpha motor neuron and the muscle fibers it innervates • A motor neuron pool is all the alpha motor neurons that innervate one muscle
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Action potential frequency is one way to control the force of muscle contraction
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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease Selective degeneration of α motor neurons in spinal cord and brainstem, and upper motor neurons in cortex Progressive muscle weakness, wasting of skeletal muscles Usually die within 5 years of onset – respiratory muscles fail Does not affect sensations, intellect or cognitive functions
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course CELL BIO & 245 taught by Professor Schjott during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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Chapter 13 Spinal Control of Movement - Chapter 13 Spinal...

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